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MARITIME CYBER SECURITY Archives - SHIP IP LTD

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Maritime blockchain solutions have the potential to greatly improve efficiencies in shipping and bring this industry into the 21st century


Shipping is the engine of the global economy, making up some 90% of world trade. That’s not easy to express in monetary terms, although experts estimate it at over $10 trillion a year. Maritime blockchain could transform this industry and bring multiple benefits to importers, exporters, transporters, ship owners, and even governments.

Blockchain at sea: How technology is transforming the maritime industry !

Blockchain technology has the potential to revolutionise the maritime industry and bring it into the 21st century. This complex ecosystem could greatly benefit from a robust digital platform to exchange data in real time.  

In fact, the industry has been testing maritime blockchain applications since 2017. Some of the most important shipping companies, such as Maersk, Hyundai Merchant Marine, and Maritime Silk Road Platform, have teamed up with tech giants to create blockchain shipping systems to streamline maritime logistics.

Maritime blockchain speeds up document flows

One of the main benefits of introducing blockchain to the maritime industry is cutting down bureaucracy. For international shipments, companies and customs officials are forced to fill out over 20 different types of documents (most of them paper-based) to move goods from exporter to importer.

Most of these documents fail to provide real-time visibility and data quality, which often causes setbacks in financial settlements. These types of delays and inefficiencies are hard to accept in a data-driven, digital world.

An international consortium of shipping companies and European customs has tested a blockchain solution that eliminates printed shipping documents from the process. Not only did blockchain speed up operations, but this pilot proved how organisations in the maritime industry can save hundreds of millions of dollars annually.

Blockchain not only makes cargo checks faster, it also minimises the risk of penalties for customs compliance that are levied on customers.

The maritime industry can also benefit from predictive analytics

Big data is having a huge impact on the industry, thanks to its potential to optimise operations, improve cybersecurity, and increase the overall efficiency of the supply chain.  

However, data alone can’t change the way the maritime industry works. Companies, ports, and governments need to analyse the information to reap real benefits from the findings. This industry generates about 100-120 million data points every day. It was impossible for existing technologies to gather and analyse this amount of data efficiently.

Blockchain can help by placing the crucial data in one place and creating a unique platform for solution providers, ports, and agents that operate along the supply chain.

By tracking cargo in real time using blockchain technology, shipping companies and ports can plan land procedures ahead of time, speeding up terminal works and cutting down costs. They can also use data to make educated predictions that enhance their operations and increase efficiency.

Maritime blockchain increases trading safety and transparency

The maritime industry includes multiple parties. Most of these communicate through lengthy paper chains, making it impossible to track shipments currently. This, combined with high transaction volumes, leads to little or no transparency in most processes.

Blockchains can secure the integrity of any record, reducing the risk of damaged or missing shipments. By replacing the old paper system, all parties involved have access to information, making it easier to plan operations efficiently and save on costs.

The information stored in the blockchains is impossible to delete or edit without leaving traces, so this transparency also increases security.

It reduces data entry errors and can improve fraud detection. Maersk’s collaboration with IBM, for example, also stipulates the development of means to streamline customs and security inspections, as well as tracking shipping containers for commercial purposes.

Maritime blockchain and cost efficiency

The blockchain-based Bill of Lading created by Maersk and IBM showed in early tests that administrative costs could be reduced by as much as 15% of the value of shipped goods, thanks to tracking shipping containers and eliminating paper documents.

It may seem like a small percentage, but that could create savings of $1.5 trillion globally.

Besides costs related to documentation, companies can also significantly reduce expenses caused by data entry errors, procedural delays, and discrepancies.

Blockchain technology is transforming the maritime industry

The maritime industry is still struggling with high costs and a high level of pollution. Blockchain technology can help with both issues, by cutting down administrative costs and providing environment-friendly solutions. All while protecting the industry against cybercrime and piracy, and ensuring a fairer deal for all parties involved.

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Maritime Cyber attack !

Australian ferry and defense shipbuilder Austal reported Thursday that it has been hit by a cyberattack. An unknown offender managed to steal internal data, including some staff contact information and unspecified data affecting a “small number of stakeholders.” The firm emphasized that its ship design drawings for vendors and customers are neither sensitive nor classified, without specifying whether any drawings may have been taken.

Austal said that the attacker attempted to engage in extortion using the stolen information and tried to sell it online. In line with its company policy, Austal did not respond to extortion offers, the firm said.

The firm, which builds the U.S. Navy’s Independence-class Littoral Combat Ship and the Expeditionary Fast Transport, said that there were no indications that the data breach had national security implications. “Austal’s business in the United States is unaffected by this issue as the computer systems are not linked,” the company said.

The Australian Cyber Security Centre and the Australian Federal Police are investigating the attack, and the Australian Department of Defence is providing technical assistance. “This incident reinforces the serious nature of the cyber security threat faced by defence industry, and the need for industry partners to put in place, and maintain, strong cyber defences,” said the Department of Defence in a statement. Austal holds the contract to build and maintain two patrol boat classes for Australian military and government operators.

Austal said that the attack had no effect on its day-to-day operations, and that its data systems have been secured and brought fully back online.

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Digitalisation on the bridge, Digitalisation is throwing up daily challenges to the shipping industry’s established order with faster connectivity and enhanced functionality driving the transparency of information flow across almost every area of the business.

Shipping is embracing this effect – and cautiously welcoming the disrupters too – and speed of adoption is quickening. What is still developing is how to apply this digital thinking to a traditional business-to-business market where the speed of technology adoption needs to fit market cycles.

What the advocates of smart shipping have recognised is that product-oriented organisations cannot adhere to 20th century business models of research-develop-build-sell-repeat and expect to thrive in the longer term.

A sustainable digital business is one that focuses on the customer first and invites a new conversation about their needs and how products and services fit around that. This can be a challenging process for organisations which have happily relied on selling hardware for decades, even if their origins lie in the invention and popularisation of such equipment.

It is doubly true when the area of operation is not purely commercial or concerned with fuel savings or schedule keeping, but the regulated safety space on the bridge. The requirement for type-approved, standards-based systems for navigation safety are a far cry from an app-based efficiency gain or drone-based spare parts delivery.

For a company that has navigation systems in its DNA, it has become a natural extension for us to think about what digitalisation can do for customers; more and more of them are working to improve connectivity on the bridge and from bridge to shore.

The data on demand model is quickly being replaced by real-time monitoring of ship systems and customers are already exploring the benefits of a richer data stream that can enhance safety and efficiency of ship operations.

There are several elements to this strategy, the first will centre around gathering data to analyse system performance and better plan servicing and maintenance of the bridge system.

Digital updates for the electronic chart display are already happening but there is a need to improve the procedure for getting the data into the front of bridge navigation system. Rather than relying on memory sticks for transfer, there should be an independently hosted back of bridge system with a secure connection to the front of bridge.

We will also employ the same secure data stream to deploy software updates and patches directly into the bridge system when the vessel is alongside and on voyage.

 

Finally, we can use the data to improve visibility from shore, such as for a port authority or vessel operations centre and so support mariners on most economic routeing, berth approach or manoeuvring operations.

This will act as an accelerator for autonomous vessel technology, but it needs to be managed in a way that increases safety and efficiency. We think that customers, rather than vendors, should decide how and at what speed the process evolves.

This new era requires that the supplier changes too; building a new skills base with people experienced in connectivity and data, so that the outcome is an improvement and not a further complication to an already complex business.

We are also aware that with greater connectivity and more data transfer comes an increased security risk, which must be managed.

Our approach is to build a cyber infrastructure which is capable of maintaining more than just an ‘air gap’ between the ship’s network and the front of bridge navigation system. This Sperry Marine Secure Maritime Gateway will go into live testing by Q4 2018 and promises to provide a robust component of a layered cyber security strategy.

This approach to digitalisation could be viewed as small steps in the right direction but it is critical that the strategy actually provides tangible results, not innovations in search of a business model. By building a platform that can be used to deliver services as well as systems we will be able to make giant leaps too.

It also reflects the fact that our service engineers are present on the bridge; we see how customers use our products and hear first-hand about the improvements and enhancements they want to see.

That gives us a unique perspective on how to create new services that meet these changing needs. For a company that has long been the go-to for radar, ECDIS, gyrocompass or autopilot – but which would always leave the operations to the shipowner – this is a completely new approach.

History and heritage are not enough to protect anyone from the challenge of digitalisation, but change need not be a threat to survival. Instead, it enables much closer dialogue on how we can support customer operations and deliver real digital value, rather than create disruption for its own sake.

ARTICLE SOURCE : by Jan Thordan Hansen, director, Sperry Marine


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OCIMF is pleased to announce the release of the seventh edition of the SIRE Vessel Inspection Questionnaire (VIQ7).

This edition has undergone an extensive revision process which has brought the VIQ up-to-date with respect to changes in legislation and best practices. The SIRE Focus Group, which has led the work on the revision of this document, has examined the questions to determine whether these continue to remain relevant and has reduced the overall set of questions by up to 90 questions.

The section on Structural Condition in the existing VIQ6 (Chapter 7) has been reduced and merged with Chapter 2. A new chapter (Chapter 7) has been developed to cover Maritime Security which has 21 new questions covering Policies and Procedures, Equipment and Cyber Security.

The section on Mooring (Chapter 9) has been significantly reviewed to incorporate the revisions and best practices that will be introduced in the Mooring Equipment Guidelines, Fourth Edition (MEG4). Operators will be encouraged to align their procedures and equipment with the guidance provided in MEG4 as soon as possible.

The existing chapter on Communications (Chapter 10) has been reduced and merged with Chapter 4, which is now a section on Navigation and Communications.

A set of 10 questions on LNG Bunkering has been added to the section on Engine and Safety Compartments (Chapter 10). These questions have been developed in conjunction with advice and guidance from SIGTTO and SGMF.

The following templates within the seventh edition of the SIRE Vessel Inspection Questionnaires (VIQ7) are now available to integrators upon the OCIMF Staging environment and will be released to the Production environment on the 17September 2018.

  • Template 4401 – VIQ7 (Petroleum)
  • Template 4402 – VIQ7 (Chemical)
  • Template 4403 – VIQ7 (LPG)
  • Template 4404 – VIQ7 (LNG)

 


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maritime cyber security Kongsberg Maritime director of autonomy Peter Due explains why e-navigation and technology developed for the Yara Birkeland project will enable a future of autonomous shipping

ECDIS and e-navigation will be essential for generations of future autonomous ships. Although the first unmanned ships will be remotely controlled and operating in coastal waters, in the long term there will be ocean-going autonomous ships, with e-navigation technology monitoring their progress onshore.

IMO placed ocean-going autonomous vessels firmly on the global agenda during the Maritime Safety Committee (MSC) 99 session in May this year, by implementing a working group to conduct a regulatory scoping exercise for using MASS (Maritime Autonomous Surface Ships)*.

Kongsberg Maritime will be part of that working group and will deliver technology to the world’s first all-electric, zero emissions and autonomous container vessel, Yara Birkeland. This ship is scheduled to transport fertiliser products along a 30 nautical mile route to the ports of Brevik and Larvik next year and by 2020 is likely to be unmanned.

Kongsberg Maritime director of autonomy Peter Due said new navigation and collision avoidance systems that centre on e-navigation technology were needed for this project, as Yara Birkeland will operate on a busy waterway.

Kongsberg drew on its experience in autonomous underwater vehicles, dynamic positioning, ECDIS and sensor fusion as a foundation for autonomous navigation. But Mr Due explained to Marine Electronics & Communications that more development was required. “Harmonising with artificial intelligence, machine learning and digital twin technology enables the extreme level of safety required,” he said.

Mr Due said Yara Birkeland’s operations will be planned, pretested and optimised in the cloud using the Kognifai digital platform and its digital twin that Kongsberg generated. This includes navigation in different metocean conditions.

“The twin integrates all data including weather, currents, tides and temperature with a detailed physical ship model,” said Mr Due. “We can then decide the optimum route and simply transfer it to the ship’s autonomy engine, navigation systems and ECDIS when it is in port,” he continued.

“Once the ship sets off, sensor fusion comes into play, enabling the autonomy engine, working with the onboard digital twin and e-navigation systems to adjust and reroute at sea according to the going conditions and other vessels in the vicinity.”

It is this dynamism a fully autonomous navigation system requires that led to the establishment of the Hull to Hull (H2H) EU-funded research project. This will develop technical solutions for safer navigation in close proximity of other stationary or moving vessels and objects.

H2H will use the European Global Navigation Satellite System to enhance safety in busy waters and during close manoeuvring. “This will help mariners to make the correct navigation decisions and will create the fundamental conditions for autonomous vessel navigation,” said Mr Due. Data can be used as an input to an autonomy controller.

Navigational safety is essential if the benefits of MASS are ever to be truly realised”

Ensuring e-navigation and collision avoidance technology works correctly will be fundamental to autonomous shipping. “Navigational safety is essential if the benefits of MASS are ever to be truly realised,” said Mr Due.

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TMSA 3, From January 2018, tanker operators are required to use TMSA3 to monitor and improve performance. In comparison with TMSA2, the new edition of TMSA is more extended in length and presents new challenges to ship operators with the introduction of new requirements.

It is noticeable that for the first time, this self-assessment tool for oil tankers introduces maritime security as Element 13 referring also to cyber security.

Cyber security is currently one of the most discussed topics on the industry and many considerable efforts have been made so far to mitigate threats. Thus, TMSA 3 aims to establish procedures in order to respond to industry’s needs.

‘’For the first time, TMSA introduces maritime security as Element 13 including cyber security’’

Also it features an expanded best practice guidance to complement the KPIs and enhanced guidelines for risk assessment, auditing and review ashore and onboard along with guidance for all related tools to be employed.

Other major changes introduced are the expansion of Element 6 on Cargo, Ballast, Tank Cleaning, Bunkering, Mooring & Anchoring Operations, and an updated Element 10 combining Environmental and Energy Management.

In the latest edition, special focus has been given on the continuous improvement cycle by taking into consideration additional KPIs towards effective performance management. Specifically, TMSA3 introduces 85 new KPIs in total. In this context, 25 KPIs have moved to a lower level and there are indexes concerning customer focus, leadership and engagement of people.

On the whole, the TMSA3 addresses issues regarding performance management. The method that a shipping company uses to measure performance is a prominent topic for discussion within the maritime industry. The new edition makes an effort to overhaul the process, not only with the streamline of KPIs but also with the introduction of non-financial measurements and the assessment of soft skills.

Furthermore, TMSA3 introduces a different approach by focusing on the human element and behavioral safety suggesting that crew competence is the tool for crew retention and development.

TMSA 3 at a glance

Expanded best practice guidance to complement the KPIs.
Revised and enhanced best practice guidance to remove ambiguity and duplication.
Additional requirements for HSSE strategic planning, KPI setting and performance monitoring, review and improvement.
Streamlining and merging of elements to improve consistency and make self-assessment easier.
Enhanced guidelines for risk assessment, auditing and review ashore and onboard along with guidance for all related tools to be employed.
Extensively Revised Element 6 and 6A – Cargo, Ballast, Tank Cleaning, Bunkering, Mooring and Anchoring Operations, with additional KPIs and guidance.
Extensively Revised Element 10 – Environmental and Energy Management (previously Environmental Management) incorporates the OCIMF Energy Efficiency and Fuel Management paper that was a supplement to the TMSA 2.
A New element: Element 13 – Maritime Security.

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MARITIME CYBER SECURITY

Changes in the cyber security industry

MARITIME CYBER SECURITY, A recent set of attacks against critical infrastructure entities, such as oil and gas pipeline operators, utilities and even some city and state governments reveal new motives and methods. The attackers were not out to steal data but were looking to disrupt services. The attackers used a new attack vector that has not been seen before. Instead of attacking their primary targets directly, they attacked less secure vendors that those targets use. We will be looking at how they did this and then how it can be prevented.

Step one – Reconnaissance

Before launching an attack, hackers first identify a vulnerable target and explore the best ways to exploit it. The initial target can be anyone in an organization. The attackers simply need a single point of entrance to get started. Targeted phishing emails are common in this step, as an effective method of distributing malware.

The whole point of this phase is getting to know the target.
The questions that hackers are answering at this stage are:

  1. Who are the important people in the company? This can be answered by looking at the company web site or LinkedIn.
  2. Who do they do business with? For this they may be able to use social engineering, by make a few “sales calls” to the company. The other way is good old-fashioned dumpster diving.
  3. What public data is available about the company? Hackers collect IP address information and run scans to determine what hardware and software they are using. They check the ICAAN web registry database.

The more time hackers spend gaining information about the people and systems at the company, the more successful the hacking attempt will be.

Step two – Weaponization

In this phase, the hacker uses the information that they gathered in the previous phase to create the things they will need to get into the network. This could be creating believable Spear Phishing e-mails. These would look like e-mails that they could potentially receive from a known vendor or other business contact. The next is creating Watering Holes, or fake web pages. These web pages will look identical to a vendor’s web page or even a bank’s web page. But the sole purpose is to capture your user name and password, or to offer you a free download of a document or something else of interest. The final thing the attacker will do in this stage is to collect the tools that they plan to use once they gain access to the network so that they can successfully exploit any vulnerabilities that they find.

Step three – Delivery

Now the attack starts. Phishing e-mails are sent, Watering Hole web pages are posted to the Internet and the attacker waits for all the data they need to start rolling in. If the Phishing e-mail contains a weaponized attachment, then the attacker waits for someone to open the attachment and for the malware to call home.

Step four – Exploitation

Now the ‘fun’ begins for the hacker. As user names and passwords arrive, the hacker tries them against web-based e-mail systems or VPN connections to the company network. If malware-laced attachments were sent, then the attacker remotely accesses the infected computers. The attacker explores the network and gains a better idea of the traffic flow on the network, what systems are connected to the network and how they can be exploited.

Step five – Installation

In this phase the attacker makes sure that they continue to have access to the network. They will install a persistent backdoor, create Admin accounts on the network, disable firewall rules and perhaps even activate remote desktop access on servers and other systems on the network. The intent at this point is to make sure that the attacker can stay in the system as long as they need to.

Step six – Command and control

Now they have access to the network, administrator accounts, all the needed tools are in place. They now have unfettered access to the entire network. They can look at anything, impersonate any user on the network, and even send e-mails from the CEO to all employees. At this point they are in control. They can lock you out of your entire network if they want to.

MARITIME CYBER SECURITY.

Step seven – Action on objective

Now that they have total control, they can achieve their objectives. This could be stealing information on employees, customers, product designs, etc. or they can start messing with the operations of the company. Remember, not all hackers are after monetizable data, some are out to just mess things up. If you take online orders, they could shut down your order-taking system or delete orders from the system. They could even create orders and have them shipped to your customers. If you have an Industrial Control System and they gain access to it, they could shut down equipment, enter new set points, and disable alarms. Not all hackers want to steal your money, sell your information or post your incriminating e-mails on WikiLeaks, some hackers just want to cause you pain.

MARITIME CYBER SECURITY

 

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Maritime Cyber Attack

Cyber attacks like the NotPetya malware that struck Maersk are raising concerns about cyber risk and its effects on resilience, according to specialty insurer XL Catlin

Shipping industry firms and port operators are worried about linkage between cyber-attacks and supply chain risk, insurer XL Catlin has warned.

Big interdependencies between systems mean maritime firms face major business continuity risks from online threats.

“The problem is that nobody knows, other than the computer systems, where your goods are,” said Pascal Matthey, head of global lines for marine risk engineering at XL Catlin.

“You might never find your container again. Refrigerated containers might lose power, which would mean huge damage,” said Matthey.

Maersk was among those organisations worst hit by the NotPetya contagious malware attack last year.

The global shipping and logistics firm had to reinstall some 4,000 servers, 45,000 PCs, and 2,500 applications; the process took 10 days and cost the company around $450m.

The company was forced to temporarily switch to manual systems – pen and paper, and lots of overtime – resulting in a temporary 20% drop in volumes.

Another cyber-attack, revealed in 2013, struck two shipping companies operating in the Belgian port of Antwerp, and had reportedly gone undetected for about two years before that.

An organised crime group allegedly used hackers to infiltrate computer networks, allowing cocaine and heroin, hidden in containers shipped from South America, to be intercepted by criminals.

“The idea was not to harm the port but to get things out by hacking the system,” said Matthey, based in the specialty insurer’s Zurich office.

He warned about the potentially catastrophic consequences of a cyber-attack by terrorists, such as targeting a ship and interfering with its steering or navigation to cause a collision in congested waters, such as a port or major trade artery such as the Panama Canal.

Maritime Cyber Attack

“What happened on 9/11, you could perhaps now do with a ship, by steering a large vessel into an oil or gas terminal, which could have disastrous consequences,” said Matthey.

XL Catlin is among those re/insurance firms involved in developing blockchain applications – distributed ledger technology for smart contracts, sharing data instantaneously between the relevant counterparties.

A new blockchain platform for marine insurance contracts at XL Catlin and MS Amlin is expected to go live this year.

Maritime Cyber Attack

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MARITIME CYBER RISK !

The insurance losses and liabilities arising from cyber risks is an increasing area of focus for both shipowners and their insurers, argues Mr. Adrian Durkin, Director (Claims) and Mr. Colin Gillespie, Deputy

Potentially owners may be exposed to gaps in cover arising from cyber incidents – an unsatisfactory situation in today’s connected world. For example, an owner’s hull and machinery insurance may contain a cyber risk exclusion which mirrors, or is derived from, institute clause 380.

There are also cyber exclusions in war risk policies that relate to computer viruses. The war risks clause is derived from market clause 3039. Many other market insurance policies specifically exclude losses or liabilities arising as a result of cyber risks.

Why is Cyber Excluded?

Cyber risks present a range of issues for insurers. Cyber risks are relatively new – claims data relating to these risks is quite limited. Another difficulty is that cyber security is not yet well established in the maritime industry. The sheer complexity of the information technology, operational technology and internet available across the industry also presents a challenge, as does the potential for cyber problems to spread quickly across the globe. As a result the likelihood, extent and costs associated with claims involving cyber risks are difficult to calculate and potentially significant, hence the reluctance to offer cover.

It is in an owner’s interests to scrutinise their various policies in order to identify potential gaps in their insurance cover. It is possible to close the gaps by working with insurers and brokers. This may require owners to demonstrate that they have robust cyber risk management practices in place both ashore and afloat. An additional premium may be payable. The market is responding to these risks – albeit slowly.

P&I Cover for Cyber Risks

The International Group of P&I Clubs’ poolable cover does not exclude claims arising from cyber risks.

This means that club members benefit from the same level of P&I cover should a claim arise due to a cyber risk, as they would from such a claim arising from a traditional risk. As always cover is subject to the club rules.

While there are currently no internationally agreed regulations in force as to what constitutes a prudent level of cyber risk management or protection, this does not mean that owners, charterers, managers or operators of ships can ignore the need to take proper steps to protect themselves in the belief that their club cover will always respond.

If a claim with a cyber element arises, an owner may need to demonstrate that they took all obvious steps to prevent foreseeable loss or liability. As more and more potential cyber risks are being identified, clubs will expect to see the operation of sensible and properly managed cyber risk policies and systems both ashore and on vessels.

MARITIME CYBER RISK

Don’t delay – act now

Barely a month goes by without news of a major cyber-attack affecting a large or high profile commercial or government entity. Cybercrime is a rapidly growing global threat in all industries and the maritime supply chain is vulnerable as the problems experienced by Maersk in 2017 have demonstrated. In that incident problems ashore had a knock on effect on vessels, highlighting the fact that as marine transport operations become more connected, the more chance there is of problems impacting across the system both ashore and afloat.

The authorities and large charterers are concerned about the risk to operations ashore and afloat and are taking steps to drive change in the industry. Actively managing cyber risks is now both a commercial and compliance priority.

Cyber Risks & ISM Code

The IMO’s Maritime Safety Committee (MSC) has confirmed that cyber risks should be managed under the ISM Code.

Resolution MSC.428(98) affirms that an approved safety management system should take into account cyber risk management and encourages administrations to ensure that cyber risks are appropriately addressed in safety management systems no later than the first annual verification of the company’s Document of Compliance after 1 January 2021.

TMSA 3

Cyber risk management has been included in TMSA 3 under elements 7 and 13. KPI 7.3.3 includes cyber security as an assigned responsibility for software management in the best practice guidelines. Under element 13 cyber security is specifically identified as a security threat to be managed. It seems clear that the oil industry has recognised the need for action from tanker owners and is encouraging action through commercial pressure via TMSA 3. For tanker operators the time to act is already here.

Rightship Inspections

Cyber risk management now forms part of Rightship inspections and a company’s cyber security maturity may be one aspect dry bulk charterers will take into account.

A Daunting Task?

The prospect of dealing with cyber security will be daunting for many shipping companies. It’s new, involves things that may not be fully understood, and most of us are not likely to have received any formal training in such risks.

What is a definite plus is that shipping companies will be very familiar with the risk management framework suggested by the IMO Guidelines on Cyber Risk Management and industry Guidelines on Cyber Security Onboard Ships. We can also use the experience gained in other sectors of industry that have already put cyber security systems in place.

2021 is not far away, but the potential for cyber risks to result in losses or liabilities is clearly already upon us.

Cyber risks can affect almost every part of a shipping company. There will be lots to do to identify risks and vulnerabilities and to take steps to prepare for, and respond to, cyber threats. It’s time for us all to act.

By Adrian Durkin, Director (Claims) & Colin Gillespie, Deputy Director (Loss Prevention), North P&I Club


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cyber security in maritime

In recent years, it has become apparent that maritime companies, ships, and ports are not adequately protected from security threats. IMO has issued a resolution giving shipowners and managers until 2021 to incorporate cyber-risk management into their ship safety plans. And the Liberian Registry has taken the typically proactive approach for which it has become renowned by launching a Cyber and Ship Security Computer Based Training which provides a comprehensive overview of cyber-security issues as well as advice on best practice pertaining to piracy, stowaways and general ship security.

cyber security in maritime

CYBER-SECURITY TRAINING  Over 40% of crewmembers report sailing on a vessel that has become infected with a
virus or malware – and only 1 in 8 crewmembers have received cyber-security training.
This module provides a comprehensive overview of the evolving field of cyber-security;
including concepts such as different types of malware, network security, identity theft,
and risk management.

 

SOURCE : LIBERIAN REGISTRY