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Maritime Safety News Archives - SHIP IP LTD

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CMA CGM and MSC to Join Maersk’s Maritime Blockchain Platform

CMA CGM and MSC Mediterranean Shipping Company (MSC) have announced they will join TradeLens, a blockchain-enabled digital shipping platform, jointly developed by A.P. Moller – Maersk and IBM.

TradeLens enables participants to connect, share information and collaborate across the shipping supply chain. The attributes of blockchain technology are ideally suited to large networks of disparate partners, says Maersk. Blockchain establishes a shared, immutable record of all the transactions that take place within a network and enables permissioned parties access to trusted data in real time.

The platform now has over 100 participants. The addition of CMA CGM and MSC will result in data for nearly half of the world’s ocean container cargo being available on TradeLens. The companies will promote TradeLens and create complementary services on top of the platform for their customers and partners.

TradeLens is already processing over 10 million discrete shipping events and thousands of documents each week for shippers, carriers, freight forwarders, customs officials, port authorities, inland transportation providers and others.

CMA CGM and MSC will operate a blockchain node, participate in consensus to validate transactions, host data, and assume the critical role of acting as Trust Anchors, or validators, for the network. The companies will be on the TradeLens Advisory Board which will include members across the supply chain to advise on standards for neutrality and openness.

“Digitization is a cornerstone of the CMA CGM Group’s strategy to provide an end-to-end offer tailored to our customers’ needs. We believe that TradeLens, with its commitment to open standards and open governance, is a key platform to help usher in this digital transformation,” said Rajesh Krishnamurthy, Executive Vice President, IT & Transformations, CMA CGM Group. “TradeLens’ network is already showing that participants from across the supply chain ecosystem can derive significant value.”

The TradeLens platform has enormous potential to spur the industry to digitize the supply chain and build collaboration around common standards, said André Simha, Chief Digital & Information Officer, MSC. “We think that the TradeLens Advisory Board, as well as standards bodies such as the Digital Container Shipping Association, will help accelerate that effort.”


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The case for autonomous ships keeps getting stronger as evidence of its commercial viability gathers pace, says One Sea eco-system lead Paivi Haikkola, who is in Singapore to attend Sea Asia 2019.

The main advantage relates to cost savings especially in fuel consumption with electricity powering more of the propulsion, she explained. The greater use of electricity as opposed to fuel also plays a role in reduced emissions as the maritime industry looks toward the global sulphur cap of 0.5% for marine fuels coming into effect next year.

Another push for autonomous shipping comes from the safety dimension, with the sensors on board to provide greater situational awareness, she added.

One Sea works with marine technology firms, ports, safety organisations, class societies and related companies to “further anything to do with maritime,” Haikkola explained. Founded in 2016 and led by innovation accelerator DIMECC (Digital, Internet, Materials & Engineering Co-Creation), One Sea is backed by Business Finland but its activities have repercussions far beyond its borders.

Research funding agency Business Finland had earlier financed Advanced Autonomous Waterborne Applications (AAWA) research.

There has been steady progress since One Sea’s founding, with Finnish legislators having authorised the DIMECC-managed Jaakonmeri Test Area off Finland’s west coast as the world’s first zone open for testing autonomous maritime traffic. Other areas internationally are being explored for similar tests.

Autonomous vessels may account for up to 17% of global shipping by 2040 according to a recent World Maritime University study but some sectors are likely to embrace it sooner than others.

“Short sea shipping where vessels move back and forth on the same route, road ferry types,” are candidates for early adoption, Haikkola said. Geographic areas catering to such marine traffic include northern Europe and parts of Asia.

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The South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA) has recently published two Marine Notices:

a) No. 8 of 2019, to advise of the global implementation of the MARPOL Annex VI limit of 0.50 mass per cent concentration (0.50% m/m) sulphur content in fuel oil, for all ships, from 1 January 2020; and

b) No. 9 of 2019, which provides a standard format for reporting fuel oil non-availability as provided in regulation 18.2.4 of MARPOL Annex VI that may be used to document if a ship is unable to obtain compliant fuel oil.

The following points may be of particular interest to our members:

1. Ships installed with exhaust gas cleaning systems (scrubbers) can continue to burn high-sulphur bunker fuel from 2020 and comply with the 0.5% sulphur limit and until further notice South Africa accepts all types of approved scrubbers.
2. South Africa has no restrictions on ships using LNG or Marine Biofuels when entering South African waters.
3. The International Bunker Industry Association has expressed confidence that low sulphur fuel oil will be available in South African ports by 1 January 2020.
4. Ships will be required to either use Annex VI compliant fuel oil when operating within South African waters or to install and use scrubbers.
5. If a ship is found not to be in compliance with the standards for compliant fuel oils, SAMSA will be entitled to require the ship to:

◦ present a record of the actions taken to attempt to achieve compliance
◦ provide evidence that it attempted to purchase compliant fuel oil in accordance with its voyage plan, and if it was not available where planned, that attempts were made to locate alternative sources of such fuel oil, and that despite best efforts to obtain compliant fuel oil, no such fuel oil was available for purchase.

6. SAMSA may also verify compliance by any methods available to it including but not limited to sampling and analysing fuel oil from a ship’s fuel oil tanks and lines and sampling and analysing air emissions from a ship’s plume.
7. A ship is unable to procure compliant fuel oil prior to entering South African waters, the master must notify SAMSA and the vessel’s own Flag Administration.

Source: The Standard Club


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Danish shipping authorities have adopted a Remotely Piloted Aircraft System (RPAS), which uses drones to detect emissions levels from ships.

The maritime emissions drone system, developed by the European Maritime Safety Agency (EMSA), is to be deployed along the Great Belt region where large tankers travel to and from the Baltic Sea. UAS Skeldar V-200 drones equipped with sulphur gas sensors, or “sniffers”, capable of detecting the sulphur emissions of individual vessels, will fly into ships’ exhaust plumes and transmit the resulting emissions data directly to the relevant authorities in Denmark. Where ships are found to have breached the EU’s maritime emissions regulations, the offence will be reported in THETIS-EU, EMSA’s port control information system.

The implementation of RPAS monitoring is expected to boost enforcement of the EU Sulphur Directive, which limits passenger vessels to fuels with a maximum sulphur content of 1.5 per cent. Since the Directive capped sulphur emissions from shipping, emissions around control regions have fallen by more than 50 per cent; with an average fuel compliance rate of 93 per cent. Enforcement of the Directive in Denmark is the duty of the Danish Environmental Protection Agency with the support of the Danish Maritime Authority, which shores up the agency’s work by conducting in-port ship inspections.

Along with the Fuel Sulphur Content sniffer system, the maritime emissions drone will be equipped with cameras capable of photographing vessels during daytime and at night; as well as an Automatic Identification System (AIS) receiver to enable the RPAS to identify and track offending ships. Authorities will be able to track the flight path of the drone in real time using EMSA’s RPAS data centre, which provides flight details, images, video and measurement data. EMSA has developed RPAS solutions to assist in maritime surveillance operations in a number of fields, including detection and prevention of illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing, drug trafficking and illegal immigration.

 

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As the maritime sector is being targeted by highly motivated cyber criminals, the shipping industry should be on the highest alert for a cyber attack, Itai Sela, CEO of cyber security specialist Naval Dome, said. 

Speaking today at the Singapore Maritime Technology Conference (SMTC) 2019, organized by the Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore (MPA), Sela warned:

“Somebody, somewhere is targeting the maritime sector. The shipping industry should be on Red Alert.”

Sela’s warning follows widespread concern that the maritime industry remains vulnerable and is not doing enough to protect itself.

During a round table discussion in which several companies informed the Greek shipping community of the importance of cyber security, one analyst said that while the industry is “concerned about the cyber risk it struggles to understand where and how best to manage it”.

As stressed by Naval Dome CEO, the industry is not prepared for cyber attacks. Taking into account that shipping is a USD 4 trillion global industry transporting 80% of the world’s energy, commodities and goods, any activity that disrupts global trade would have far-reaching consequences.

“It is easy to understand why shipping is now in the cross-hair of the cyber-criminal or activist. But the maritime industry still believes it is enough to have a Level 1 solution to protect against a Level 4 threat,” Sela commented.

Referring to the global certification standard IEC 62443, which has been adopted by several certification bodies, Sela explained the four levels of security used for safeguarding against a cyber-attack.

“A Level 4 attack is extremely sophisticated and intended to cause the most amount of disruption for either political, social or financial gain. It is the Level 4 type attack criminals are using to penetrate the shipping industry,” Sela said, recalling an incident in which the navigational equipment aboard a fleet of 15 tankers was simultaneously hacked.

 

As explained, the easiest way for hackers to penetrate ship systems is to attack systems at the ship manager or original equipment manufacturer’s (OEM) head office.

“All a hacker has to do is infiltrate these systems and wait until some someone sends an infected email to someone onboard ship – the attack is delivered. It spreads. It’s autonomous.”

The current regulations consider improving interactions between the operator and machine as the optimum way of combating maritime cyber crime. However, Naval Dome believes the best solution is based on technology that removes the human element altogether.

In his presentation to the Singapore maritime community, Sela suggested that a ship can be used as a very effective weapon to “create chaos and destruction” at the port.

“A ship whose systems are under the control of the cyber-criminal could result in pollution, cause collisions or groundings, or be used as an incendiary device. The result could be catastrophic if a vessel is not secured to the highest level.”

Sela also said that a country like Singapore must have the ability to monitor all the ships that enter its waters in order to verify whether it’s infected or cyber clean.

“I strongly recommend that all port authorities have the ability to control the cyber threat that each and every vessel entering their waters brings with them. This will protect assets and avoid potential disaster,” he concluded.

 

SOURCE


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Digitalisation on the bridge, Digitalisation is throwing up daily challenges to the shipping industry’s established order with faster connectivity and enhanced functionality driving the transparency of information flow across almost every area of the business.

Shipping is embracing this effect – and cautiously welcoming the disrupters too – and speed of adoption is quickening. What is still developing is how to apply this digital thinking to a traditional business-to-business market where the speed of technology adoption needs to fit market cycles.

What the advocates of smart shipping have recognised is that product-oriented organisations cannot adhere to 20th century business models of research-develop-build-sell-repeat and expect to thrive in the longer term.

A sustainable digital business is one that focuses on the customer first and invites a new conversation about their needs and how products and services fit around that. This can be a challenging process for organisations which have happily relied on selling hardware for decades, even if their origins lie in the invention and popularisation of such equipment.

It is doubly true when the area of operation is not purely commercial or concerned with fuel savings or schedule keeping, but the regulated safety space on the bridge. The requirement for type-approved, standards-based systems for navigation safety are a far cry from an app-based efficiency gain or drone-based spare parts delivery.

For a company that has navigation systems in its DNA, it has become a natural extension for us to think about what digitalisation can do for customers; more and more of them are working to improve connectivity on the bridge and from bridge to shore.

The data on demand model is quickly being replaced by real-time monitoring of ship systems and customers are already exploring the benefits of a richer data stream that can enhance safety and efficiency of ship operations.

There are several elements to this strategy, the first will centre around gathering data to analyse system performance and better plan servicing and maintenance of the bridge system.

Digital updates for the electronic chart display are already happening but there is a need to improve the procedure for getting the data into the front of bridge navigation system. Rather than relying on memory sticks for transfer, there should be an independently hosted back of bridge system with a secure connection to the front of bridge.

We will also employ the same secure data stream to deploy software updates and patches directly into the bridge system when the vessel is alongside and on voyage.

 

Finally, we can use the data to improve visibility from shore, such as for a port authority or vessel operations centre and so support mariners on most economic routeing, berth approach or manoeuvring operations.

This will act as an accelerator for autonomous vessel technology, but it needs to be managed in a way that increases safety and efficiency. We think that customers, rather than vendors, should decide how and at what speed the process evolves.

This new era requires that the supplier changes too; building a new skills base with people experienced in connectivity and data, so that the outcome is an improvement and not a further complication to an already complex business.

We are also aware that with greater connectivity and more data transfer comes an increased security risk, which must be managed.

Our approach is to build a cyber infrastructure which is capable of maintaining more than just an ‘air gap’ between the ship’s network and the front of bridge navigation system. This Sperry Marine Secure Maritime Gateway will go into live testing by Q4 2018 and promises to provide a robust component of a layered cyber security strategy.

This approach to digitalisation could be viewed as small steps in the right direction but it is critical that the strategy actually provides tangible results, not innovations in search of a business model. By building a platform that can be used to deliver services as well as systems we will be able to make giant leaps too.

It also reflects the fact that our service engineers are present on the bridge; we see how customers use our products and hear first-hand about the improvements and enhancements they want to see.

That gives us a unique perspective on how to create new services that meet these changing needs. For a company that has long been the go-to for radar, ECDIS, gyrocompass or autopilot – but which would always leave the operations to the shipowner – this is a completely new approach.

History and heritage are not enough to protect anyone from the challenge of digitalisation, but change need not be a threat to survival. Instead, it enables much closer dialogue on how we can support customer operations and deliver real digital value, rather than create disruption for its own sake.

ARTICLE SOURCE : by Jan Thordan Hansen, director, Sperry Marine


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Cleaner Marine Shipping – A global corporation called Wärtsilä is pushing “An Oceanic Awakening,” due in part to all the stuff people order online.

The awakening is taking place around a SEA20 effort, which is calling on major port cities including New York, Singapore, Hamburg, Helsinki and Rotterdam to develop a digitalized marine ecosystem – or Smart Marine – by 2020. “This encompasses connectivity, data-sharing, intelligent automation and intelligent, carbon-free vessels, which feature efficient designs, hybrid propulsion technologies and cleaner fuels for eco-friendly shipping,” says Wärtsilä, which is headquartered in Helsinski, Finland, and makes power plants and marine equipment.

How will they get it done? SEA20 has reportedly assembled key influencers from the targeted cities to participate in an online forum and ongoing series of events and workshops; including FOOD designer/founder Dong-Ping Wong, who has worked on projects for Kanye West and Nike.

How would a “smarter” Big Apple look? SEA20 reimagines it “with offshore ports allowing for pop-up test sites within the city itself – like retail hubs and fresh produce markets,” also taking pointers from ORE Design + Technology Founder/Principal Architect Thomas Kosbau, rePLACE Urban Studio’s Peter Syrett and The Dream Corps CEO Vien Truong.

Wärtsilä President and CEO Jaakko Eskola argues that shipping is the most cost-effective way to move goods and people around the world. Demand is increasing, and so are opportunities to improve operational inefficiencies that hurt profitability and sustainability:

“We simply cannot afford to wait for the marine and energy industries to evolve at their own pace. The calls for greater efficiency, sustainability, and connectivity are simply too strong to be ignored. Rapid acceleration to benefit the entire sector, as well as society at large, is urgently required, and ‘An Oceanic Awakening’ is our wake-up call to everyone, heralding the beginning of our journey to making the future of shipping and energy a reality.”

The wave seems to be growing slowly. A SEA20 Twitter forum has just over 60 followers as of this writing. But a company rep say much more participation and activity is on the horizon, including summits to be held and intelligence reports to be issued. A total of 20 port cities are being targeted.

“Hamburg, Helsinki and Rotterdam have already expressed their keen interest in joining this global initiative,” said Andrew Calzetti, a Wärtsilä spokesman. “We are in active discussions with around 10 cities at the moment and have a great many more on our radar, all of which play an important role in the marine ecosystem, either because of the volume of trade they handle, their history, or because of the investment they are making in innovative solutions which foster more sustainable shipping. We will be making those and other port announcements in due time.”

Calzetti says most issues afflicting port cities and marine industries are open-ended and highly complex, so solving them requires collaboration across disciplines.

Figures from an Energy Transition Outlook estimate that shipping will grow nearly a third by 2050, resulting in the doubling of container cargo.

While initiatives like the Paris Climate Agreement and International Maritime Organization mandates are helping address the environmental impacts of mass urbanization and shipping, few are specifically focused “on bringing a unified design vision to maritime projects that are shaping marine cities,” he said. “That, to us, signaled the need for our initiative, SEA20.”
Source: Forbes


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Are the maritime industries about to be revolutionised by smart shipping or is the sector not yet ready for the fourth industrial revolution? It is a highly emotive subject and the Parliamentary Debate at Seatrade Maritime Middle East will see six leading industry executives, all with strong opinions debate the motion: “This House believes the shipping industry is not yet ready to embrace smart shipping”.

On the one hand Smart Shipping has the potential to transform the fundamentals of ship operation, with digital technology and big data driving radical new solutions up to and including autonomous ships.

But on the other what does the industry actually want from these new technologies, how real are the efficiencies they offer and what changes to the regulatory framework would be needed prior to significant implementation?

The Parliamentary Debate held on 29 October at Seatrade Maritime Middle East in Dubai will be chaired by leading maritime lawyer Jasamin Fichte, Managing Partner of Fichte & Co.

Speaking for the motion are: Khalid Hashim, Managing Director, Precious Shipping, Ali Shehab Ahmad, Deputy Chief Executive Officer, Kuwait Oil Tanker Company (KOTC) and Captain David Stockley, Chief Operating Officer, Oman Ship Management Company.

On the side against the motion are: René Kofod-Olsen, Chief Executive Officer, Topaz Energy and Marine, Oskar Levander, Senior Vice President Concepts & Innovation, Rolls Royce Marine, and Ronald Spithout, President, Inmarsat Maritime.

So is the industry ready or not to embrace smart shipping? There is only one way to find out – attend the debate, listen to the arguments, and then as the parliamentarians (audience) you vote on which side wins the debate.

ARTICLE SOURCE CLICK LINK


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The Maritime Safety Committee (MSC), at its 99th session, adopted the Amendments in accordance with the procedure laid down in the Procedures for amending and updating the International Aeronautical and Maritime Search and Rescue (IAMSAR) Manual. The Committee agreed that the amendments should become applicable on July 01, 2019.

SOLAS regulation V/21 requires all ships to carry an up-to-date copy of IAMSAR Manual Volume III. A new point 1.8 has been included in the Manual for the search and rescue operations (SAR) by maritime rescue services in time of armed conflict.

Recognizing the important role search and rescue operations play in implementing its provisions, GC II extends protection to small coastal rescue craft and fixed coastal rescue installations used by such craft, such as rescue coordination centres, repair boats, sickbays and hangars for their humanitarian mission, including for SAR operations concerning civilians.

Such craft and their associated fixed coastal rescue installations, when employed by a State that is party to a conflict (whether by its armed forces or by civilian governmental agencies) or by officially recognized lifeboat institutions (i.e. the institution must have been approved or authorized by a governmental authority or other public body to perform coastal rescue functions, which presupposes the existence of a legal or administrative framework in the State in which the lifeboat institution operates to provide for its prior approval or authorization in peacetime) “shall be respected and protected, that is, may not be attacked, captured or otherwise prevented from performing their humanitarian tasks, so far as operational requirements permit“.

International Aeronautical and Maritime Search and Rescue (IAMSAR) Manual

 


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Seafarer Mental Health.

The UK Chamber of Shipping, Nautilus International and the National Union of Rail, Maritime and Transport Workers (RMT)
have jointly agreed the following guidelines to shipping companies on drawing up policies on mental health and mental illness.
Companies are recommended to adopt such policies;

if they already have policies in place, they are recommended to review
them in the light of these guidelines.

 

The aims of shipping companies’ policies on mental health and mental illness should include:

• To promote the health, safety and welfare of seafarers
• To foster a company culture that is conducive to improving
the mental health of seafarers
• To ensure awareness of the importance of good mental
health among company managers
• To provide support for staff who are identified as having
mental health problems, ensuring that they are treated with
sympathy and respect and in confidence
• To increase awareness among all staff of the potential signs
of mental health problems
• To provide training to staff in having conversations with
others about their mental health.

3.1 The policy should be in writing and should:

• Designate a director as having overall responsibility for the
policy, whilst indicating the commitment from the full
management board to the policy
• Indicate concern for the health, safety and welfare of
seafarers and others in the company
• Promulgate positive messages to staff indicating that the
company promotes the good mental health of all staff, thereby
fostering a supportive company culture
• Provide literature via noticeboards and/or company intranet
to promote awareness of the benefits of personal interaction and
communication to good mental health
• Provide details of persons within and external to the company
who are trained in listening to persons wishing to discuss their
state of mental health.

3.2 The policy should make clear that the company recognises
that mental health problems may be short-term, long-term or
permanent.

It should not focus solely on remedial measures for
seafarers suffering mental health problems, but on improving the
mental health of all its seafarers.

3.3 The policy should promote to a workplace environment that is
conducive to good mental health, including management styles
that treat seafarers with respect and value their opinions and
eliminating harassment and bullying.

3.4 The policy should promote the organisation of social and
team-building events that are inclusive and open to all and
encourage all employees to contribute ideas for these. It should
also encourage volunteering and other out-of-work activities that
can contribute to improving mental health.

3.5 The policy should also make clear the company’s commitment
to overcoming and eliminating any culture of silence or stigma
that might exist over mental health. This could be done by
discussing the subject openly in individual and staff meetings.

SOURCE UK CHAMBER OF SHIPPING