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CMA CGM and MSC to Join Maersk’s Maritime Blockchain Platform

CMA CGM and MSC Mediterranean Shipping Company (MSC) have announced they will join TradeLens, a blockchain-enabled digital shipping platform, jointly developed by A.P. Moller – Maersk and IBM.

TradeLens enables participants to connect, share information and collaborate across the shipping supply chain. The attributes of blockchain technology are ideally suited to large networks of disparate partners, says Maersk. Blockchain establishes a shared, immutable record of all the transactions that take place within a network and enables permissioned parties access to trusted data in real time.

The platform now has over 100 participants. The addition of CMA CGM and MSC will result in data for nearly half of the world’s ocean container cargo being available on TradeLens. The companies will promote TradeLens and create complementary services on top of the platform for their customers and partners.

TradeLens is already processing over 10 million discrete shipping events and thousands of documents each week for shippers, carriers, freight forwarders, customs officials, port authorities, inland transportation providers and others.

CMA CGM and MSC will operate a blockchain node, participate in consensus to validate transactions, host data, and assume the critical role of acting as Trust Anchors, or validators, for the network. The companies will be on the TradeLens Advisory Board which will include members across the supply chain to advise on standards for neutrality and openness.

“Digitization is a cornerstone of the CMA CGM Group’s strategy to provide an end-to-end offer tailored to our customers’ needs. We believe that TradeLens, with its commitment to open standards and open governance, is a key platform to help usher in this digital transformation,” said Rajesh Krishnamurthy, Executive Vice President, IT & Transformations, CMA CGM Group. “TradeLens’ network is already showing that participants from across the supply chain ecosystem can derive significant value.”

The TradeLens platform has enormous potential to spur the industry to digitize the supply chain and build collaboration around common standards, said André Simha, Chief Digital & Information Officer, MSC. “We think that the TradeLens Advisory Board, as well as standards bodies such as the Digital Container Shipping Association, will help accelerate that effort.”


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Maritime blockchain solutions have the potential to greatly improve efficiencies in shipping and bring this industry into the 21st century


Shipping is the engine of the global economy, making up some 90% of world trade. That’s not easy to express in monetary terms, although experts estimate it at over $10 trillion a year. Maritime blockchain could transform this industry and bring multiple benefits to importers, exporters, transporters, ship owners, and even governments.

Blockchain at sea: How technology is transforming the maritime industry !

Blockchain technology has the potential to revolutionise the maritime industry and bring it into the 21st century. This complex ecosystem could greatly benefit from a robust digital platform to exchange data in real time.  

In fact, the industry has been testing maritime blockchain applications since 2017. Some of the most important shipping companies, such as Maersk, Hyundai Merchant Marine, and Maritime Silk Road Platform, have teamed up with tech giants to create blockchain shipping systems to streamline maritime logistics.

Maritime blockchain speeds up document flows

One of the main benefits of introducing blockchain to the maritime industry is cutting down bureaucracy. For international shipments, companies and customs officials are forced to fill out over 20 different types of documents (most of them paper-based) to move goods from exporter to importer.

Most of these documents fail to provide real-time visibility and data quality, which often causes setbacks in financial settlements. These types of delays and inefficiencies are hard to accept in a data-driven, digital world.

An international consortium of shipping companies and European customs has tested a blockchain solution that eliminates printed shipping documents from the process. Not only did blockchain speed up operations, but this pilot proved how organisations in the maritime industry can save hundreds of millions of dollars annually.

Blockchain not only makes cargo checks faster, it also minimises the risk of penalties for customs compliance that are levied on customers.

The maritime industry can also benefit from predictive analytics

Big data is having a huge impact on the industry, thanks to its potential to optimise operations, improve cybersecurity, and increase the overall efficiency of the supply chain.  

However, data alone can’t change the way the maritime industry works. Companies, ports, and governments need to analyse the information to reap real benefits from the findings. This industry generates about 100-120 million data points every day. It was impossible for existing technologies to gather and analyse this amount of data efficiently.

Blockchain can help by placing the crucial data in one place and creating a unique platform for solution providers, ports, and agents that operate along the supply chain.

By tracking cargo in real time using blockchain technology, shipping companies and ports can plan land procedures ahead of time, speeding up terminal works and cutting down costs. They can also use data to make educated predictions that enhance their operations and increase efficiency.

Maritime blockchain increases trading safety and transparency

The maritime industry includes multiple parties. Most of these communicate through lengthy paper chains, making it impossible to track shipments currently. This, combined with high transaction volumes, leads to little or no transparency in most processes.

Blockchains can secure the integrity of any record, reducing the risk of damaged or missing shipments. By replacing the old paper system, all parties involved have access to information, making it easier to plan operations efficiently and save on costs.

The information stored in the blockchains is impossible to delete or edit without leaving traces, so this transparency also increases security.

It reduces data entry errors and can improve fraud detection. Maersk’s collaboration with IBM, for example, also stipulates the development of means to streamline customs and security inspections, as well as tracking shipping containers for commercial purposes.

Maritime blockchain and cost efficiency

The blockchain-based Bill of Lading created by Maersk and IBM showed in early tests that administrative costs could be reduced by as much as 15% of the value of shipped goods, thanks to tracking shipping containers and eliminating paper documents.

It may seem like a small percentage, but that could create savings of $1.5 trillion globally.

Besides costs related to documentation, companies can also significantly reduce expenses caused by data entry errors, procedural delays, and discrepancies.

Blockchain technology is transforming the maritime industry

The maritime industry is still struggling with high costs and a high level of pollution. Blockchain technology can help with both issues, by cutting down administrative costs and providing environment-friendly solutions. All while protecting the industry against cybercrime and piracy, and ensuring a fairer deal for all parties involved.

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Maritime Blockchain !

What is blockchain technology ?

A blockchain, originally block chain,is a continuously growing list of records, called blocks, which are linked and secured using cryptography.

Each block typically contains a cryptographic hash of the previous block,a timestamp and transaction data.

By design, a blockchain is inherently resistant to modification of the data. It is “an open, distributed ledger that can record transactions between two parties efficiently and in a verifiable and permanent way”.

For use as a distributed ledger, a blockchain is typically managed by a peer-to-peer network collectively adhering to a protocol for validating new blocks. Once recorded, the data in any given block cannot be altered retroactively without the alteration of all subsequent blocks, which requires collusion of the network majority.

 

Source : Wikipedia

Maritime Blockchain

BlockChain Technology in Maritime Industry

Previously, blockchain technology served as the basis for securing bitcoin transactions. Now, this technology promises to supersede hundreds of years of maritime commercial practice by replacing bills of lading and attendant transactional documents with a secure online mechanism to buy and sell goods.

Maersk and IBM plan to establish a joint venture aimed at offering a global trade digitization platform by using blockchain technology.

The platform will be designed for use by the entire global shipping ecosystem and address the need for greater transparency and simplicity in the movement of goods across borders and trading zones.

Lloyd’s Register has formed a partnership with company Bloc aimed at creating Maritime Blockchain Labs, small scale experiments on the use of blockchain in the shipping industry.

The OceanChain Foundation has launched a new blockchain-based platform to support maritime trade, including a related cryptocurrency called Ocash designed to be used in settlement of cross-border transactions or transactions in international waters.

Hong Kong-based company 300cubits has successfully conducted the first trial shipment under its smart contract deployed through its Ethereum blockchain technology.

Malaysian liner company West Port and Brazilian textile importer LPR have taken part in the trial.

The trial has seen the use of TEU tokens, which have been developed by 300cubits and are referred to as Bitcoin of the shipping industry.

TEU tokens can be used to solve no-show bookings and other issues.

Maritime Blockchain

Blockshipping has been started by a group of Danish shipping and technology experts, with several former Maersk employees on its executive team.

A new platform powered by blockchain technology and cryptocurrency could help save the shipping industry USD 5.7bn annually. That’s the aim of Blockshipping, to kickstart a project that they say will change the way shipping containers are managed.