GDPR Archives - SHIP IP LTD

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• Our crew – we control the quality of our crew end-to-end and we provide equality and ethics that are recognized by our crew – we are confident that their performance is unmatchable;
• A diverse fleet which equally is separated between Offshore, Tankers, Dry/Cargo vessels;
• We bring the knowledge and high expectations of top-notch projects on hi-tech assets to all the segments and to all the types of vessels;
• Transparency – there are no bad surprises with OSM. Communication with our customers is second to none and all costs or possible issues are not hidden under the carpet;
• Solid financial position;
• One stop shop in the maritime industry – a variety of services for our customers to find a partner and not a supplier.

 

Source: osm


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The Royal Navy has been called in to help cut the masts from a sunken cargo ship in the River Thames, after the latest survey revealed decay could trigger a deadly explosion of 1,400 tonnes of explosives on board.

The SS Richard Montgomery was an American Liberty ship, which ran aground on the Nore sandbank in the Thames Estuary in August 1944, during World War II. Despite attempts to remove its dangerous cargo, the ship’s hull cracked and it sank off Medway, in Kent.

The Maritime and Coastguard Agency, which monitors the condition of the wreck and carries out regular surveys, had previously considered the risk of an explosion as remote.

But the latest survey found the ship’s three masts were deteriorating and in a poor state. Reports have found cracks in the vessel’s hull are increasing, prompting fears that further decay to the wreck could trigger an explosion that would “throw a 300 metre-wide column of water and debris nearly 3,000 metres into the air and generate a wave 5 metres high”, according to a new report by the Ministry of Defence (MoD).

 

Source: marineindustrynews


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Vi står i Horten over for en spændende rejse mod effektivisering og digitalisering af vores processer og arbejdsgange. Vi søger derfor en erfaren GDPR-jurist, som trives i en rolle med et stort koordinerende, udførende og selvstændigt ansvar i Hortens spændende tværgående projekter. Motiveres du af at omsætte din viden og erfaring inden for GDPR til praktiske løsninger, så vil vi rigtig gerne høre fra dig.

INTERN COMPLIANCE-TEAMET I HORTEN
Du bliver del af Hortens Interne Compliance-team med reference til Hortens Compliance Manager. Intern Compliance er til daglig en del af Hortens stærke GDPR-team, hvor vi nyder godt af faglig og ledelsesmæssig opbakning.

Horten har en resultatorienteret kultur, hvor der ikke er langt fra tanke til handling. Du kommer til at få en central rolle i implementeringen af nye arbejdsprocesser og valg af IT-leverandører. Opgaverne kræver, at du sætter dig ind i Hortens arbejdsgange og bidrager med konkrete løsningsforslag i overensstemmelse med kravene på databeskyttelsesområdet.

 

Source: jobbank


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The maritime patrol aircraft market report offers a comprehensive analysis of the strategies adopted by vendors and the trends, drivers, and challenges affecting the market size. The growing marine threats are projected to significantly support market growth during the forecast period. However, the growing adoption of strategic bombers in maritime patrol will hamper the market.

Technavio analyzes the market by Type (maritime patrol fixed-wing aircraft and maritime patrol rotorcraft) and Geography (North America, APAC, EuropeSouth America, and MEA). This report presents a detailed picture of the market by the way of study, synthesis, and summation of data from multiple sources by an analysis of key parameters.

42% of the maritime patrol aircraft market growth will originate from APAC during the forecast period. China and Japan are the key markets for maritime patrol aircraft in APAC. The maritime patrol aircraft market share growth by the maritime patrol fixed-wing aircraft segment will be significant. From the maritime patrol aircraft market segmentation insights, players can achieve maximum market response by understanding the target consumers.

Companies Mentioned

  • Airbus SE
  • BAE Systems Plc
  • Embraer SA
  • Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd.
  • Leonardo Spa
  • Lockheed Martin Corp.
  • RUAG Group
  • Saab AB
  • Thales Group
  • The Boeing Co.

 

Source: prnewswire


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Responding to the increasing threat of cyber-attacks in the maritime sector, Bureau Veritas and insurance consultancy major BESSÉ have announced a partnership to support shipowners with tailored solutions to improve their cyber security and cyber insurance.

This partnership will see BESSÉ and BV combine their complementary expertise to help shipping stakeholders manage the risk of cyber-attacks, which has risen in recent years, particularly for shipowners. This will also be key to help them comply with IMO and IACS requirements.

To helps shipowners and operators develop and implement an effective cyber security strategy on ships and ashore BV has developed a set of rules (NR 659) which make up a framework for assessing maritime cyber security. This framework enables BV to assess the level of cyber risk and to recommend organizational, technical and procedural measures to reduce this risk to an acceptable level. This process includes:
• conducting a complete inventory of equipment, systems and networks connected at sea and on land
• conducting a cyber risk analysis to identify vulnerable systems and equipment
• developing and implement a cyber risk management policy;
• ensuring the effective implementation of technical and organizational procedures
• enabling shipowners/operators to ensure compliance with IMO cyber security requirements
• validating the management of cyber risk on board through an additional Class Notation.
BESSÉ then responds to the identified risks through insurance solutions, by helping shipowners transfer part of the cyber risk to insurers. As many insurance companies now require their clients to demonstrate high standards for cyber risk management, BESSÉ builds on the results of the systems optimization achieved though BV’s rules to assist its clients in presenting these risks to insurers.

Gildas Tual, Director of BESSÉ Maritime and Logistique, said: “Managing cyber risk is still a new challenge for companies in general, and shipowners and operators in particular. This is why we are delighted to partner with Bureau Veritas to offer tailor-made solutions for our clients.”

Matthieu de Tugny, President of Bureau Veritas Marine & Offshore, said that BV’s “evidence-based picture” assessing the cyber resilience of a ship or a fleet “provides the basis for the insurance industry to meet the new expectations of shipowners and operators.”

Coming together under the Secretariat General de la Mer, several French stakeholders are providing a coordinated response to maritime cyber risk. Working in parallel to IMO’s work on adapting regulation to help shipowners put appropriate protection measures in place, the Cyber Council of the Maritime World (C2M2) was created, of which BESSÉ and BV are members. Moreover, a France Cyber Maritime Association was created at the end of 2020.

 

Source: shipmanagementinternational


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Ah, the unassuming shipping container. It’s really nothing more than a big steel box with a couple of doors. At any given time, millions of containers are piled on ships plying the world’s waterways. Battered by weather and waves, they are packed with just about anything you can imagine — exotic fruits and vegetables, cheap clothing and electronics, parts for cars and trucks.

“Globalization, as we know it today, would not have been possible without the container,” says Marc Levinson, an economist, a historian and the author of two books on shipping containers.

These days during the coronavirus pandemic, with the holidays fast approaching, jampacked container ships have gotten stuck in traffic at ports, which is choking the economy. Delayed containers have become both a symptom of and a contributor to global supply chain problems. But if one looks back, cargo has generally moved more easily and cheaply now than it did before these big boxes came around, making them almost indispensable to the global economy.

Goods used to be loaded one by one

Before containers, shipping was prohibitively expensive because every piece of cargo had to be loaded on vessels separately.

“On a typical vessel in the 1950s, you might have 200,000 different items … and then each had to be taken out of a ship separately when the ship arrived in port,” Levinson says. “So it took a long time to load and unload a ship. There was a lot of cargo that was damaged. There was a lot of cargo that was lost or stolen.”

In 1956, an American entrepreneur named Malcom McLean used the first modern container ship. He owned a trucking company and was looking for ways to avoid congestion on the highways. McLean came up with the idea of taking the containers off his trucks and putting them on ships.

“His first ship was called the Ideal X. It was a tanker that had been built during World War II,” Levinson says. “The deck was essentially a frame into which the containers could be secured.” That tanker carried just 58 containers.

Containers went overseas a decade later

The first international container ship voyage was in 1966 between Newark, N.J., and Rotterdam in the Netherlands. That changed shipping dramatically. New trade routes formed, special cranes were invented for loading and unloading containers, and bigger and bigger vessels were built.

Janet Porter, editorial board chair of Lloyd’s List, a London-based maritime information service, remembers in 1996 seeing what was then the world’s largest container ship — it could carry 6,000 containers.

“And it was seen as absolutely huge. Barriers had been broken,” Porter says. “And now … they’re just tiddlers,” she says, using a British expression for miniature. “I mean, the biggest ships are about 24,000.”

Now the boxes have additional uses

Containers are used now for more than just shipping. They’re transformed in many parts of the world into makeshift schools, restaurants, clinics and prisons. Architects in wealthier countries are turning them into high-end modular homes.

California-based company Crate Modular, for example, uses containers to make affordable multifamily apartments, temporary housing for people experiencing homelessness and school buildings.

“We procure these empty one-way-trip shipping containers, and then we bring them to our factory in Carson, California,” says the company’s vice president for development, Amanda Gattenby. “We convert them from shipping containers into housing by cutting the sides out, combining them together to make larger spaces, adding steel, putting in plumbing and electrical and drywall.”

The finished apartments are fully insulated and include tiled bathrooms, air conditioning and high ceilings, Gattenby says.

“In the last two years, we’ve produced 432 beds for homelessness and 81 units of affordable housing, as well as some commercial and educational projects, converting over 350 shipping containers into state-approved buildings,” she says.

Supply and demand up the cost

Now during the pandemic, people are buying so many more goods that it’s boosting demand and leading to a shortage of containers, which has sent their prices surging, according to Porter of Lloyd’s List.

She says they went from $1,500 for a 20-foot container and $2,800 for a 40-footer in late 2019, up to $3,000/$5,800 in 2020. Now they are about $4,000/$6,400, but she has seen spot deliveries go as high as $6,000/$8,000.

She expects that the prices will drop once the supply chain crisis ebbs.

“The reason there’s a shortage is because a lot of them are stuck on ships that are waiting outside ports because of this supply chain crisis,” Porter says. And not only does that cause delays for businesses waiting for goods and parts to arrive, but she adds that “those containers can’t be moved back to where they’re needed.”

The shipping containers can’t be unloaded at the docks fast enough to be sent back to Asia, where they’ll be used again to help meet consumer demand.

China, the world’s largest manufacturer of shipping containers, is trying to pick up slack — companies there produced 300,000 containers in September alone, Reuters reported.

But no matter how many there are, the supply chain crisis won’t be solved until the containers are more quickly unloaded and turned around.

 

Source: wamu


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Excavation of the Canal had taken ten years, using forced labor and rudimentary mechanical equipment.

Construction had been opposed by British interests, who feared competition in trade with India. Once the Canal opened and proved successful, British interests acquired a majority ownership.

The Canal was closed to shipping during the Suez Crises of 1956-57 and during the Arab-Israeli Wars of 1967 and 1973. In 2008, over 21,000 ships transited the Canal, earning the Government of Egypt over $5 billion in tolls.

On August 6, 2015, a second lane to the Canal has been completed and placed into service.

 

Source: maritimecyprus


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Responding to the increasing threat of cyber-attacks in the maritime sector, Bureau Veritas (BV), a specialist in testing, inspection, and certification, and insurance consultancy major BESSÉ have announced a partnership to support shipowners to improve their cyber security and cyber insurance.

This partnership will see BESSÉ and BV combine their expertise to help shipping stakeholders manage the risk of cyber-attacks, which has risen in recent years, particularly for shipowners. This will also be key to help them comply with International Maritime Organization (IMO) and International Association of Classification Societies (IACS) requirements.

Bureau Veritas helps shipowners and operators develop and implement an effective cyber security strategy on ships and ashore. To this end, BV has developed a set of rules (NR 659) which make up a framework for assessing maritime cyber security.

This framework enables BV to assess the level of cyber risk for shipowners/operators and to recommend organizational, technical and procedural measures to reduce this risk to an acceptable level. This process includes:

  • conducting a complete inventory of equipment, systems and networks connected at sea and on land;
  • conducting a cyber risk analysis to identify vulnerable systems and equipment;
  • developing and implement a cyber risk management policy;
  • ensuring the effective implementation of technical and organizational procedures;
  • enabling shipowners/operators to ensure compliance with IMO cyber security requirements.
  • validating the management of cyber risk on board through an additional Class Notation.

BESSÉ then responds to the identified risks through insurance solutions, by helping shipowners transfer part of the cyber risk to insurers, according to a statement.

As many insurance companies now require their clients to demonstrate high standards for cyber risk management, BESSÉ builds on the results of the systems optimization achieved though BV’s rules to assist its clients in presenting these risks to insurers.

“Managing cyber risk is still a new challenge for companies in general, and shipowners and operators in particular. This is why we are delighted to partner with Bureau Veritas to offer tailor-made solutions for our clients,” said Gildas Tual, Director of BESSÉ Maritime and Logistique.

This partnership is in line with several initiatives in this field. For several years, shipping companies have been regular targets of intrusions and attempted attacks on their information systems.

Coming together under the Secretariat General de la Mer, several French stakeholders are providing a coordinated response. Working in parallel to IMO’s work on adapting regulation to help shipowners put appropriate protection measures in place, the Cyber Council of the Maritime World (C2M2) was created, of which BESSÉ and BV are members. Moreover, a France Cyber Maritime Association was created at the end of 2020.

 

Source: container-news


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The Abraham Accords set in motion enhanced maritime security and defense capabilities in the Eastern Mediterranean.

The UAE, Bahrain, the U.S. and Israel cooperated in a five day exercise in the Red Sea to reinforce defense and security relationships in the maritime domain,.

Vice Admiral Brad Cooper, commander of NAVCENT, U.S. 5th Fleet and Combined Maritime Forces, said: “It is exciting to see U.S. forces training with regional partners to enhance our collective maritime security capabilities. Maritime collaboration helps safeguard freedom of navigation and the free flow of trade, which are essential to regional security and stability.”

Last week, Israeli Air Force F-15s escorted two US B-1B strategic heavy bombers and a KC-10 refueler over Israeli airspace on their way to the Gulf.

It was the second such flight in two weeks.

According to an IDF statement, it was “a significant step in maintaining the security of the skies of the State of Israel and the Middle East”.

Last month, the IDF held their Blue Flag exercise with seven other air forces, including the USAF, the RAF and other European partners, which including Egypt, Jordan, Bahrain and Saudi Arabia.

As one source noted: “More joint military exercises among Abraham Accord partners are also anticipated in the future.”

The U.S. Fifth Fleet is headquartered in Bahrain.

During my two visits to Bahrain in 2019, I had a chance to talk about the evolving defense and security capabilities being reshaped in the region and in October 2019 provided a presentation on the final day of the BIDEC 2019 Conference.

One of the subjects which I raised during my presentation was the coming of maritime autonomous systems and the value to Bahrain of such systems,.

Significant investments are being made in Bahrain in science and technology, and applications to he maritime autonomous systems domain make a great deal of sense.

Also, the ISR capabilities which such systems can provide to Bahrain as a pillar for their evolving information base for security and defense also make a great deal of sense as well.

 

Source: sldinfo


The Coastguard has released jaw-dropping footage of an air rescue, with the crew on board a stricken yacht off Salcombe ‘just minutes from death’.

Abi Wild, the winch paramedic who came to the couple’s rescue, says: “They were the worst conditions I’ve ever faced, and probably the most dangerous rescue I’ve been involved in.”

The couple from Essex were rescued by the Coastguard as their Transworld 41 yacht broke up in bad weather on the rocky Salcombe coastline. Mark Morrow and Deborah Mitchell were sailing to Gibraltar for a trip of a lifetime having recently moved onto their yacht, the 17-ton Lady Rosemary.

 

Source: marineindustrynews