POST STATE CONTROL Archives - SHIP IP LTD

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The new IMO global sulphur cap requirements enter force on 1st January 2020 and a robust and consistent approach to compliance is expected by all Port State Control (PSC) regimes. PSC inspections will be carried out in accordance with the IMO PSC procedures, the 2019 guidelines for PSC under MARPOL Annex VI.

In order to establish whether a ship is in compliance, PSC inspectors will likely focus their attention on documents and procedures maintained on board. In certain jurisdictions PSC inspectors will carry portable sulphur testing kits and if the results of these tests are inconclusive or indicate potential non-compliance then additional sampling will take place for verification ashore.

It is important therefore that ships’ crews are aware and familiar with the new regulations, associated documentation and procedures and are able to confidently demonstrate this knowledge to a PSC inspector.

Bunker Delivery Notes (BDNs) and Fuel Sampling

Details of fuel delivered on board for combustion purposes should be recorded by means of a BDN. The BDN should be accompanied by a Representative Sample of the fuel delivered – the MARPOL Sample. Most ships will also take commercial samples in the normal way. The Representative Sample is to be sealed and signed by the supplier’s representative and the Master (or senior officer in charge of the bunker operation) on completion of bunker delivery and retained on board until the fuel has been substantially consumed, but in any case for a period of not less than twelve months from the time of delivery. BDNs and associated samples should be easily identifiable and filed properly on board. BDNs should be retained on board for at least three years after the fuel has been received on board.

There are two locations where fuel sampling might be required by PSC: (1) downstream of the fuel oil service tank and (2) the storage tanks, “in use” and “on-board” respectively. In accordance with ISO 4259-2: 2017, and allowing for a 95% confidence limit, the maximum amount of sulphur allowed in these samples is 0.11% m/m for ECA fuel and 0.53% m/m for global fuel.

In situations where the Commercial Samples (taken during bunkering) indicate a higher sulphur content than noted on the BDN then the flag administration and PSC at destination need to be notified in writing without delay. Note that the ship will have likely sailed by the time these test results are known. In the event of any further investigation by PSC, the Representative Sample (MARPOL sample) will be used by PSC for further verification procedures and the ship may be ordered to de-bunker the fuel at the next port.

 

SOURCE : MARINE INSIGHT


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India has decided to act on reducing plastic litter pollution and has introduced a ban on the use of single-use plastics onboard calling vessels.

The ban will require some items to be locked away and introduces a new requirement for recording all single-use plastics onboard vessels. The ban applies to all Indian vessels and to foreign flag vessels calling at Indian ports.

The ban will take effect in two stages – the first effective immediately and the second stage on 1 January 2020.

The immediate ban applies to single-use plastic items used as:

  • Cutlery, plates and cups
  • Water and other drinks bottles up to 10 litres
  • Garbage and shopping bags
  • Dispensing containers for cleaning fluids which are less than 10 litres.

Taking effect from 1 January 2020, the following single-use plastics are prohibited:

  • Bags, trays, containers, food packaging film
  • Milk bottles, freezer bags, shampoo bottles, ice cream containers
  • Bottle for water and other drinks, dispensing containers for cleaning fluids, biscuit trays
  • Hot drink cups, insulated food packaging, protective packaging for fragile items
  • Microwave dishes, ice cream tubs, potato chip bags, bottle caps.

The North of England P&I club has advised that enforcement will be done by Port State Control and that affected plastic items must be stored prior entering Indian territorial waters. Vessels calling at Indian ports are required to make a log entry identifying the ‘Single Use Plastic Items’ on board the ship, along with the onboard location of where these items are stored, and the time and ship’s position of when this is done. No single use plastic items are to be discharged to a port reception facility at Indian ports.

PSC inspectors may verify compliance with this regulation as part of a PSC inspection. However, the Directorate General of Shipping (DGS) has stated that no detentions of foreign ships will be enforced. A handwritten deficiency in the printed PSC Form ‘B’ (to be rectified prior departure) may be issued.


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22nd October 2019

1. The primary regulations impacting the inventory of hazardous materials are as follows:
a) The Hong Kong International Convention for the Safe and Environmentally Sound
Recycling of Ships, not yet in force, and
b) The European Regulation No. 1257/2013 on Ship Recycling (EU SRR), having already
entered into force in December 2016, regulates the safe and environmentally sound
recycling of EU flagged vessels but also expanding to cover non-EU flagged vessels of
their last voyage from EU waters.

2. The Hong Kong International Convention covers the design, construction, operation and
preparation of ships, to facilitate sustainable ship recycling without compromising safety and
operational efficiency. EU SRR closely follows the text of HKC and is designed to facilitate
early adoption of the Convention.

3. The Hong Kong International Convention for the Safe and Environmentally Sound
Recycling of Ships.

4. The Hong Kong Convention was adopted in May 2009. After the entry into force of the
Convention, the development and maintenance of an Inventory of Hazardous Materials (IHM),
which identifies the amount and location of hazardous materials onboard a ship, will be
required for all ships over 500 GT. Furthermore, ships shall only be recycled at ship recycling
facilities authorized in accordance with the Convention.

5. Essential to the implementation scheme of the Hong Kong Convention and the EU SRR is
the development and maintenance of a document referred to as the Inventory IHM, listing the
type and amount of hazardous materials and their location on board. An IHM must be thorough
and ship specific and updated throughout the life of a vessel to support an effective plan to
discard hazardous materials.

6. Upon entry into force of the Hong Kong Convention all vessels to which this circular applies
should be certified in accordance with the requirements of the Convention. This Administration
recommends the early preparation of the IHM in order to smoothly implement the requirements
of the Convention after its entry into force.
IHM should be completed taking into account the relevant IMO guidelines and it should be
verified by a Recognized Organization to this Administration.
1/2

7. The EU Regulation No 1257/2013 on Ship Recycling (EU SRR)

8. EU adopted Regulation (EU) No. 1257/2013 which brings into force an early implementation
of the requirements of the Hong Kong Convention for the development and maintaining IHM,
including requirements for foreign or non-EU flagged ships.
The EU SRR will affect the owners of non-EU-flagged vessels calling at EU ports or
anchorage earlier than the Hong Kong Convention.

9. This requires a foreign or non-EU-flagged vessels of 500 GT and more, including
submersibles, floating crafts, floating platforms, self-elevating platforms, Floating storage units
(FSUs), and Floating Production Storage and Offloading Units (FPSOs), including a vessel
stripped of equipment or being towed, calling at EU ports or anchorages, to have onboard
a verified IHM, that identifies at least the hazardous materials required by the EU
Regulation, and a Statement of Compliance at the earliest by 31 December 2020.

10. It is important to note that, currently, any non-EU flagged vessel having a last voyage that
either starts from an EU port, or transits through an EU port, is subject to EU Waste Shipment
Regulation (and not the EU SRR). Therefore owners are advised to contact relevant EU port
authorities well in advance of the last voyage their vessel for further information.

11. Ship owners/ Ship operators/Managers and masters are required to take note of the above.
It is strongly recommended that owners and operators of existing vessels with IHMs start
planning to comply with EU SRR well ahead of December 2020 in order to avoid delays.

Revision History: Rev 1; Paragraphs 2,3,4,6,7,8,9 and 10 have been revised.

  ST. VINCENT AND THE GRENADINES CIRCULAR N° GEN 024 - Rev.1 (15.3 KiB, 63 hits)

 

 


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Port state control organization Tokyo MOU has accepted Panama as the 21st member authority.

This was decided at the Tokyo MOU’s 30th meeting in Majuro, the Marshall Islands, held from October 14 to 17, 2019.

Having completed a three-year term as a cooperating member authority, Panama applied for full membership of the Tokyo MOU. The committee considered the application and the report of a fact finding mission, which confirmed full compliance with the qualitative membership criteria by Panama.

In accordance with provisions of the Memorandum of Understanding on Port State Control in the Asia-Pacific Region (Tokyo MOU), the committee unanimously agreed to accept Panama as the member authority.

As explained, the committee considered and adopted amendments to the memorandum relating to full membership of Panama.

Tokyo MOU was signed among eighteen maritime authorities in the region in December 1993 and came into operation in April 1994.

Current full member authorities include Australia, Canada, Chile, China, Fiji, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, Republic of Korea, Malaysia, Marshall Islands, New Zealand, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Philipines, Russia, Singapore, Thailand, Vanuatu and Vietnam, with Mexico being a cooperating member.


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Guidance on inspections of ships by the port States in accordance with Regulation (EU) 1257/2013 on ship recycling Inventory of hazardous materials Overview IHM

 

The purpose of Regulation (EU) No 1257/20131 on ship recycling (hereinafter the “SRR”) is to prevent, reduce, minimise and, to the extent practicable, eliminate accidents, injuries and other adverse effects on human health and the environment caused by ship recycling. The Regulation is also designed to enhance safety, the protection of human health and of the Union marine environment throughout a ship′s life-cycle; in particular to ensure that hazardous waste from such ship recycling is subject to environmentally sound management. The Regulation also lays down rules to ensure the proper management of hazardous materials on ships.

The aim of this EMSA guidance is to assist the Member States and their designated inspectors in their efforts to fulfil the requirements of SRR and PSC Directive, in relation to inspections covering the respective requirements of these two instruments. It is a reference document that provides both technical information and procedural guidance thus contributing to harmonised implementation and enforcement of the provisions of the SRR and the PSC Directive.

Inventory of hazardous materials Overview IHM

During each inspection of a ship initiated under the PSC Directive regime, the port State control inspector (PSCO), as a minimum, must check the inventory certificate s (IC) or a ready for recycling certificate (RfRC) or a statement of compliance (SoC) as applicable is kept on board and report this in THETIS.
The IC and RfRC formats, which have been established, respectively, under Commission Implementing Decisions (EU) 2016/2325 and 2016/2321 can be found in Annexes 4 and 5 of this guidance document. A model of a SoC that may be used for ships flying the flag of a third country is provided in Annex 3 of this guidance document.
It should be noted that, any initial check of the SR certificates or the PSCO’s observations of the ship may reveal clear grounds to imply that the ship is not in compliance with the SRR. In this case, the PSCO will continue the inspection under the SRR regime.

Before boarding, relevant information about the ships in port may be obtained from THETIS or THETIS-EU and other sources (e.g. from AIS, NGOs, port Authorities etc). This may include information on ship particulars, last and next port of call, arrival and departure times, port stay duration, possible intention to send the ship for recycling etc. Further information may directly be obtained through the port Authorities or the ship’s agent

The general application date of the SRR was 31 December 2018. From thereon, new EU ships6 have to carry a the inventory certificate (IC) and EU ships going for recycling have to carry a ready for recycling certificate (RfRC).
However, it should be noted that existing EU ships7 shall only carry a certificate on the inventory of hazardous materials (IC) from 31 December 2020.
Moreover, non-EU ships should only be requested to submit a statement of compliance (SoC), together with the inventory of hazardous materials, from 31 December 2020.

Inventory of hazardous materials Overview IHM

  INSPECTIONS FROM THE EU PORT STATES TO ENFORCE PROVISIONS OF THE SHIP RECYCLING REGULATION INVENTORY OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS OVERVIEW IHM (2.8 MiB, 49 hits)


Leading classification society ClassNK has released its annual report on Port State Control. The report aims to assist ship operators and management companies in maintaining compliant operations by providing information about ships detained by PSC as well as deficiencies that were found on board from many port states in 2018.

In line with the International Safety Management (ISM) Code, PSC inspections ensure that vessels departing the port meet international standards and have proved to be highly effective in eliminating substandard ships that are in operation. They oversee not only the hardware of a ship, but also the software by examining the maintenance and operation methods being used.

To help its customers improve safety management systems and overall fleet quality, ClassNK has included a breakdown of deficiencies which shows that fire safety-related deficiencies continue to be the most frequent detainable deficiencies item. ISM, lifesaving appliances and safety of navigation also remain major items where many detainable deficiencies are found.

The ClassNK report also provides detailed analyses on PSC detentions by flag state, port state, ship type, ship size, and ship’s age as well as a summary of major amendments made to international conventions such as the SOLAS Convention. These amendments have further widened the scope of PSC inspections, a trend that will undoubtedly continue as the rules applied to ships increase and diversify.

 

Download ClassNK Port State Control Annual Report June 2019

Reference: classnk.or.jp

 


PARIS MOU – Guidance on Procedures for Operational Controls

This Guideline is solely drafted for the purpose of providing guidance to the PSCO in performing a PSC inspection on the subject matter. This Guideline does not restrict the PSCO in the scope of inspection or in using his/her professional judgement while performing the PSC inspection. Third parties cannot claim any rights based on this guideline with regard to the PSC inspection as performed by the PSCO.
The goal of this guidance is to provide Port State Control Officers with procedures how to carry out operational controls including drills.

PARIS MOU – Guidance on Procedures for Operational Controls

 


Port State Control detentions due to ISM failures are becoming more common as the authorities are grouping deficiencies together to justify detaining the ship. The objectives of the International Safety Management (ISM) Code are to ensure safety at sea, prevention of human injury or loss of life, and avoidance of damage to the environment and property.

The objectives of the ISPS Code are to ensure security of ships and port facilities. The company is responsible for implementing an effective safety and security management system to ensure these objectives are met. By doing this, the risk to the fleet can be minimized and avoid costly fines and Port State Control detentions. Effective implementation of ISM and ISPS will protect the fleet’s reputation and help to get most out of the company’s resources.

To help reduce these risks, as a minimum, the items on the checklists below should be included as part of your final checks prior to voyage and port entry to ensure they continue to conform to international convention requirements. It is strongly advised that all items are checked on an ongoing basis to supplement your own operational and maintenance procedures and your Flag State’s requirements.

This guide should be used in conjunction with the normal pre-port arrival and departure checks required by international regulations and in conjunction with on board routine maintenance programs. If any of the items identified in the checklists are not in good working condition, the crew should take appropriate steps to remedy the situation prior to arrival into port.

SOURCE READ FULL ARTICLE


Maritime Cyber Security The maritime sector is being targeted by highly motivated cyber criminals, and the shipping industry should be on the highest alert for a cyber-attack, warned Naval Dome CEO Itai Sela.

Speaking at the Singapore Maritime Technology Conference (SMTC) 2019, organized by the Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore, Sela said: “Somebody, somewhere is targeting the maritime sector. The shipping industry should be on Red Alert.”

Sela’s warning follows widespread concern that the maritime industry remains vulnerable and is not doing enough to protect itself.

During a round table discussion in which several companies informed the Greek shipping community of the importance of cyber security, one analyst said that while the industry is “concerned about the cyber risk it struggles to understand where and how best to manage it.”

U.S. congressman John Garamendi made a similar comment during a Brookings Institution debate on securing U.S. maritime commerce. “Congress is aware of the cyber risks,” he said, “but not adequately engaged nor adequately addressing the problem.”

“The maritime industry is just not prepared,” Sela told SMTC delegates. “Shipping is a $4 trillion global industry responsible for transporting 80 percent of the world’s energy, commodities and goods, so any activity that disrupts global trade will have far reaching consequences.

“It is easy to understand why shipping is now in the cross-hair of the cyber-criminal or activist. But the maritime industry still believes it is enough to have a Level 1 solution to protect against a Level 4 threat.”

Referring to the global certification standard IEC 62443, which has been adopted by several certification bodies, Sela explained the four levels of security used for safeguarding against a cyber-attack.

“A Level 4 attack is extremely sophisticated and intended to cause the most amount of disruption for either political, social or financial gain. It is the Level 4 type attack criminals are using to penetrate the shipping industry,” Sela said, referring to an incident in which the navigational equipment aboard a fleet of 15 tankers was simultaneously hacked.

The easiest way for hackers to penetrate ship systems is to attack systems at the ship manager or original equipment manufacturer’s (OEM) head office, said Sela. “All a hacker has to do is infiltrate these systems and wait until some someone sends an infected email to someone onboard ship – the attack is delivered. It spreads. It’s autonomous.”

Sela said: “For a few thousand dollars sophisticated ‘viruses’ can be easily bought on the dark web, so it is quite easy to implement a Level 4 attack now. Level 4 cyber protection result in a system or equipment that even those with enough time, money and motivation will be unable to penetrate. Every shipboard PC-based system has to be protected individually.”

The current regulations consider improving interactions between the operator and machine as the optimum way of combating maritime cyber crime. However, Naval Dome believes the best solution is based on technology that removes the human element altogether.

In his presentation to the Singapore maritime community, Sela suggested that a ship can be used as a very effective weapon to “create chaos and destruction” at the port.

“A ship whose systems are under the control of the cyber-criminal could result in pollution, cause collisions or groundings or be used as an incendiary device. The result could be catastrophic if a vessel is not secured to the highest level. Over the last three years we have developed a type-approved Level 4 solution certified to prevent shipboard systems from being hacked.”

Sela said a country like Singapore must have the ability to monitor all the ships that enter its waters in order to verify whether its infected or cyber clean. “I strongly recommend that all Port Authorities have the ability to control the cyber threat that each and every vessel entering their waters brings with them. This will protect assets and avoid potential disaster,” he said.

SOURCE FULL ARTICLE LINK


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USCG

USCG The Coast Guard District 8 Outer Continental Shelf Officer in Charge, Marine Inspections recently released two Marine Safety Information Bulletins regarding marine casualty reporting and the requirements for installed data plates on lifesaving appliances.

• MSIB 19-01 updates marine casualty reporting guidance and procedures for OCS units operating within the Gulf of Mexico. Compliance with MSIB 19-01 will ensure timely initial notifications to the appropriate Coast Guard unit.
• MSIB 19-02 reiterates that data plates are required for lifesaving appliances, as outlined in MSIB 17-02. To allow the offshore industry time to verify compliance, deficiencies will not be written until July 1, 2019.

source read full article click here


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