Maritime Safety News Archives - SHIP IP LTD

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Loneliness of Seafarers !

Researchers call for better provision to prevent mental health issues for those working at sea

Long working hours, isolation and extended periods away from home put seafarers at risk of poor mental health, new research by Cardiff University finds.

The study, funded by the Institution of Occupational Safety and Health (IOSH), urges cargo shipping companies to provide greater support for workers to help prevent conditions such as anxiety and depression. This includes the provision of on-board amenities such as internet access, improved accommodation and recreational activities.

More than 1,500 seafarers completed a questionnaire on their experiences for the research, while face-to-face interviews were conducted with a small group of seafarers, employers, maritime charities and other stakeholders. Lack of internet access, long periods away from friends and family, poor accommodation and food were among the leading causes of concern for those working at sea.

Professor Helen Sampson, who led the study, says there is evidence that recent-onset psychological disorders are increasing among serving seafarers, yet more than half (55%) of employers said they had not introduced any policies or practices to address mental health for a decade.

When questioned in an interview about suffering from mental ill-health, one seafarer said: “Between pressure, workload, no days off and you are a gazillion miles away from home with limited communication, what do you think is going to happen?” Another said: “Three months on land is nothing. You can’t see your kids grow up, you can’t see anything. You are just like an uncle coming and going.”

Professor Sampson, Director of Cardiff University’s Seafarers International Research Centre, based in the School of Social Sciences, said: “It is all too easy for seafarers working out on the deep ocean to be invisible to those ashore. Their remoteness allows for abuse to go undetected. Sometimes seafarers are subjected to bullying and harassment by superiors and colleagues on board.  However many employers also mistreat seafarers by failing to provide decent and humane living conditions which promote good mental wellbeing. This research, funded by the Institution of Occupational Safety and Health, reveals that seafarers working on cargo ships experience very little happiness on board and suffer the consequences of social isolation, stressful working conditions, fatigue, and monotonous institutional environments. It is time such issues were properly addressed.”

The report concludes that the provision of free internet access would make the most significant contribution to improving the mental health and wellbeing of those working onboard ships. Other areas for focus include better terms and conditions of work, relationships with colleagues on board, accommodation and recreation.

Duncan Spencer, Head of Advice and Practice at IOSH, said: “Lone workers or those working in small crews in remote areas often work without close interaction with other employees or family members. They face a unique set of challenges and are particularly vulnerable when it comes to their mental health.

“Organisations employing remote workers need to shift their approach to follow similar standards that are being implemented in other industries. Poor leadership and culture in the organisation, excessive pressure, bullying and harassment are factors that have the potential to negatively impact on workers’ mental health and wellbeing. It is crucial that these are seriously considered and given a proportionate approach.”

Specific recommendations from the researchers include:

  • At least one activity on-board, such as basketball, squash or swimming;
  • At least four activities from table tennis, darts, barbecues, karaoke, bingo, and card and board games;
  • A gym with at least three pieces of equipment;
  • At least two facilities from a sauna, a book and DVD library, satellite TV with cabins and a library of interactive video games;
  • Comfortable mattresses and furnishings within cabins;
  • Shore leave at every opportunity for all ranks;
  • Varied, good quality food.

In addition, organisations are urged to provide self-help guidance on improving mental resilience, provide contracts that balance work and leave time, introduce and enforce anti-bullying and harassment policies, train officers on creating a positive on-board atmosphere and set up confidential counselling services.

(Source: www.iosh.com/seafarerswellbeing)


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Maritime Cyber Security – Naval Dome CEO Itai Sela says that while it is true that the inadvertent downloading of a computer virus from the internet or a memory stick is a serious cyber security issue for shipping companies, the industry should be wary of attributing system breaches to human error.

In agreement with comments made yesterday in Dubai during a Cyber Risk and Data Theft seminar, that cyber security is still considered by shipping companies and terminal operators as an after-thought, Sela does not agree that better cyber awareness, crew training or the implementation of crew guidelines alone will have a lasting positive effect.

“When the cyber-criminal will always need the unwitting assistance of an unsuspecting crew member, technician or employee to activate or spread the virus, irrespective of the level of their cyber training or awareness, it is not enough to put it under the ‘human factor’ umbrella or apportion individual blame when a critical system has been breached.

“A cyber incident happens because systems are not protected, and hackers will continue to develop innovative ways and sophisticated solutions intended to take advantage of any weak spots in human nature. The implication, therefore, is that any cyber awareness training is a waste of time and money.”

The sophisticated methods hackers use is evident by the deployment of a new, previously unknown malware trojan called xHunt, which researchers at Palo Alto Networks’ Unit 42 say is being used to specifically target the shipping industry. It is alleged that xHunt and Hisoka – a backdoor used to facilitate trojan delivery – were successful in infiltrating the networks of two shipping companies operating out of Kuwait.

“The attackers have added some fun capabilities to Hisoka and its associated toolset. The attackers are aware of probable security measures in place at their targets and have attempted to develop ways to get in undetected,” Ryan Olson, Vice President of threat intelligence at Unit 42, told ZDNet.

Given that hackers will always find a way in, Sela believes attributing blame to individuals is pointless. It is also problematic because of the potential legal proceedings envisioned should a virus result in damage to the ship, its systems, personnel or the environment.

Maritime Cyber Security !

“It would be very easy to point the finger at an individual crew member, technician or employee for inadvertently spreading malware or other viruses, but this would not prevent further system breaches. What it will do is create unnecessary friction between employers and employees.”

He adds that limiting crew members’ access to the internet, social media or mobile phone charging facilities will also create problems.

“Prohibiting internet access is not the answer. This is now considered a basic human right and with many seafarers away from loved ones for months at a time, if they are unable to maintain regular contact with those at home, then not only could it adversely affect their well-being but deter others from a maritime career.”

Sela says the maritime sector – shipping companies and port operators – needs to adopt technical solutions to prevent system hacking, rather than simply implementing a culture change.

Recalling incident where a Mobile Offshore Drilling Unit lost control of its Dynamic Positioning system while drilling in the Gulf of Mexico, Sela says the investigation found that various crew members introduced malware when they plugged in their smart phones, and other devices.

“Would this have been considered human error if the DP and associated OT systems were adequately protected and the hack thwarted? I doubt it. If cyber-crime continues to be designated a human factor event, then the industry does not fully grasp the cyber problem.”
Source: Naval Dome


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What are the key elements of TMSA 3 (Tanker Management Self Assessment)?

 

On the 10th of April 2017, OCIMF (The Oil Companies International Marine Forum) released TMSA 3, the latest edition of the Tanker Management and Self-Assessment (TMSA) programme providing Tanker companies with a means to improve and measure their safety management systems.

TMSA 3 revised and updated all twelve of the existing elements from the previous two editions and introduced a thirteenth – ‘Maritime Security.’

What are the 13 key elements of TMSA 3?

The 13 key elements of TMSA 3 are as follows:

Leadership and the safety management system

Recruitment and management of shore-based personnel

Recruitment, management, and wellbeing of vessel personnel

Vessel reliability and maintenance including critical equipment

Navigational safety

Cargo, ballast, tank cleaning, bunkering, mooring and anchoring operations

Management of change

Incident reporting, investigation, and analysis

Safety management

Environmental and energy management

Emergency preparedness and contingency planning

Measurement, analysis, and improvement

Maritime security

the newest element ‘Maritime Security‘ mainly consists of:

  • Use of Risk Assessment solution to identify and mitigate risks
  • Define and maintain a stock of equipment for vessel hardening as per BMP 4 guidelines.
  • Define Operational Security Area and monitor the number of transits of vessels as per Operation Security Reports made in the solution.
  • Circulate travel advisory and threat level data sharing to vessels using the document system.
  • Verify armed guards qualification criteria before employing them onboard vessels using our standard measurement list

SOURCE


The Maritime Safety Committee (MSC) is meeting for its 101st session, with a busy agenda encompassing maritime autonomous surface ships, polar shipping, goal-based standards and other agenda items. A number of draft amendments will be adopted, including amendments to mandatory Codes covering the carriage of potentially hazardous cargoes:

the MSC is set to adopt the draft consolidated edition of the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes Code (IMSBC Code), and a comprehensive set of draft amendments to the International Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships Carrying Dangerous Chemicals in Bulk (IBC Code).The MSC will be updated on the regulatory scoping exercise on maritime autonomous surface ships, taking into account different levels of autonomy.

 

On polar shipping, the MSC is expected to approve draft guidance for navigation and communication equipment intended for use on ships operating in polar waters and further consider how to move forward with developing requirements for ships operating in polar waters but not currently covered by the Polar Code.

A new agenda item will look at fuel oil safety. A range of guidance and guidelines will be approved, including those related to standardization and performance standards for navigational equipment, linked to the development of e-navigation.

The MSC was opened by IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim and is being chaired by Mr. Brad Groves (Australia).

Source: IMO


Cyber Adversaries Targeting Commercial Vessels

This bulletin is to inform the maritime industry of recent email phishing and malware intrusion attempts that targeted commercial vessels. Cyber adversaries are attempting to gain sensitive information including the content of an official Notice of Arrival (NOA) using email addresses that pose as an official Port State Control (PSC) authority such as: port @ pscgov.org. Additionally, the Coast Guard has received reports of malicious software designed to disrupt shipboard computer systems. Vessel masters have diligently reported suspicious activity to the Coast Guard National Response Center (NRC) in accordance with Title 33 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) §101.305 – Reporting, enabling the Coast Guard and other federal agencies to counter cyber threats across the global maritime network.

As a reminder, suspicious activity and breaches of security must be reported to the NRC at (800) 424-8802. For cyber attempts/attacks that do not impact the operating condition of the vessel or result in a pollution incident, owners or operators may alternatively report to the 24/7 National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center (NCCIC) at (888) 282-0870 in accordance with CG-5P Policy Letter 08-16, “Reporting Suspicious Activity and Breaches of Security.” When reporting to the NCCIC, it is imperative that the reporting party notify the NCCIC that the vessel is a Coast Guard regulated entity in order to satisfy 33 CFR §101.305 reporting requirements. The NCCIC will in turn forward the report to the NRC that will then notify the cognizant Coast Guard Captain of the Port (COTP).

The Coast Guards urges maritime stakeholders to verify the validity of the email sender prior to responding to unsolicited email messages. If there is uncertainty regarding the legitimacy of the email request, vessel representatives should try contacting the PSC authority directly by using verified contact information. Additionally, vessel owners and operators should continue to evaluate their cyber defense meaures to reduce the effect of a cyber-attack. For more information on the NCCIC’s services, cyber-related information, best practices, and other resources, please visit: https://www.dhs.gov/CISA.

The Coast Guard applauds companies and their vessels for remaining vigilant in the identification and prompt reporting of suspicious cyber-related activities. Questions pertaining to this bulletin may be directed to the Coast Guard Office of Commercial Vessel Compliance’s Port State Control Division (CG-CVC-2) at PortStateControl@uscg.mil.

DOWNLOAD THE BULLETIN

 

 

 


Final preparations are underway for a 12-metre-long ship to set sail from Canada and attempt the world’s first transatlantic crossing without a crew.

 

TOLLESBURY, England: 

Final preparations are underway for a 12-metre-long ship to set sail from Canada and attempt the world’s first transatlantic crossing without a crew.

The USV Maxlimer, an unmanned surface vessel, is bound for the south coast of England and will conduct deep sea surveys on the way, guided by a skipper in a control station in Britain. The voyage is expected to take about 35 days.

The ship was built by Sea-Kit International, which develops vessels for the maritime and research industries, for the Shell Ocean Discovery XPRIZE, a competition to autonomously survey the sea bed.It can launch and recover autonomous underwater vehicles but has the potential to operate in different roles with different cargo.”(It is) almost like a utility pick-up vehicle of the sea, it’s robust, it’s adaptable, it’s got a huge range,” said SEA-KIT International Managing Director Ben Simpson.

The vessel is operated by a hand-held remote control when in harbour and when at sea it can stream live data to the controller via multiple satellite links.

“What is now available through technology is very, very similar to what you have on the bridge of a ship and in many ways, I would argue, even more comprehensive,” said James Fanshawe, a director of SEA-KIT.”The controller here in this station can actually see all the way round on the horizon near real-time and in many ships it’s quite difficult to actually even see what’s behind you from the bridge of that ship,” said Fanshawe.

COMMENT

The company said it sees a future for unmanned vessels as they can remove humans from harm’s way.The team said ships that do not need to accommodate people also have significant economic and environmental benefits.”You don’t need a bridge, you don’t need a galley, you don’t need water supplies, you don’t need air conditioning and suddenly the size of that vessel becomes a fraction of the size of vessels currently being used offshore,” Simpson said.The combination of size and hybrid diesel-electric propulsion cuts fuel use by around 95 percent, the company said.

 

SOURCE READ FULL ARTICLE


Singapore, Airbus Helicopters’ Skyways unmanned air vehicle has successfully completed its first flight demonstration at the National University of Singapore (NUS). The drone took off from its dedicated maintenance centre and landed on the roof of a specially designed parcel station where a parcel was automatically loaded via a robotic arm. Once successfully loaded with the parcel, the Skyways drone took off again and returned to land, demonstrating its automatic unloading capability.

This inaugural flight demonstration follows the launch of the experimental project with the Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore (CAAS) in February 2016 to develop an urban unmanned air system to address the safety, efficiency, and sustainability of the air delivery business in cities such as Singapore. The collaboration was subsequently extended in April 2017 with Singapore Post (SingPost) becoming the local logistics partner to the project.

Airbus Helicopters is the overall Skyways system architect and provider, contributing its capabilities in drone platforms as well as its concept of future parcel delivery. This concept involves systems and structures that allow drones to land, dock with secure structures, discharge or take on payloads, and then fly off to other destinations.

“Today’s flight demonstration paves the way positively to our local trial service launch in the coming months. It is the result of a very strong partnership among the stakeholders involved, especially the close guidance and confidence from the CAAS,” said Alain Flourens, Airbus Helicopters’ Executive Vice President of Engineering and Chief Technical Officer. “Safe and reliable urban air delivery is a reality not too distant into the future, and Airbus is certainly excited to be a forerunner in this endeavour.”

Airbus Helicopters is at an advanced stage of the Skyways project. The research and development phase is progressing well, with equipment and facilities installed at the NUS campus. Various tests are already underway, and the unmanned air system will be demonstrated in the university when the trial service commences this year. Campus students and staff will be able to make use of Skyways to have small parcels between 2kg and 4kg delivered to designated parcel stations within the campus, which is the size of 150 football fields.

“The Skyways project is an important innovation for the aviation industry. CAAS has been working closely with Airbus on the project, with an emphasis on co-developing systems and rules to ensure that such aircraft can operate in an urban environment safely and optimally. For Singapore, this project will help to develop innovative rules to support the development of the unmanned aircraft industry in Singapore. We are pleased with the good progress that Skyways is making and look forward to deepening our partnership with Airbus,” said Mr Kevin Shum, Director-General, CAAS.

“The urban logistics challenge is complex and an ecosystem of parcel lockers and autonomous vehicles will be a key piece to solving this puzzle,” said SingPost Group Chief Information Officer, Alex Tan. “The trial service that is taking off later this year will be an important step forward for SingPost in our efforts to develop solutions for the future logistics needs of Singapore and other cities of the world.”

“Project Skyways aligns with NUS’ vision of serving as a living lab to pilot innovative technologies and solutions. The NUS community is very excited to be the first in Singapore to experience this novel concept of parcel delivery by drones – an endeavour that could redefine urban logistics,” said NU Senior Deputy President and Provost, Professor Ho Teck Hua. “Students from the NUS Faculty of Engineering also have the opportunity to gain valuable experience as interns with Airbus for this project. We look forward to working closely with Airbus, CAAS and SingPost to carry out the campus-wide trial.”

An experimental project aimed at developing a safe and economically viable aerial unmanned parcel delivery system for use in dense urban environments, Skyways is one of a number of innovative Urban Air Mobility projects currently being researched at Airbus. These also include the Racer high-speed helicopter demonstrator, as well as the Vahana and CityAirbus autonomous flying vehicle concepts.

About Airbus
Airbus is a global leader in aeronautics, space and related services. In 2016 it generated revenues of €67 billion and employed a workforce of around 134,000. Airbus offers the most comprehensive range of passenger airliners from 100 to more than 600 seats and business aviation products. Airbus is also a European leader providing tanker, combat, transport and mission aircraft, as well as one of the world’s leading space companies. In helicopters, Airbus provides the most efficient civil and military rotorcraft solutions worldwide.

SOURCE READ FULL ARTICLE


Overview

BIMCO’s Documentary Committee has agreed a new standard Cyber Security Clause that requires the parties to implement cyber security procedures and systems, to help reduce the risk of an incident and mitigate the consequences should a security breach occur.

In the wake of recent costly cyber security incidents involving large shipping companies, cyber security has become a major focus in the maritime industry.

BIMCO has taken a lead position on cyber security issues through its active role at the International Maritime Organization and by co-authoring the “Industry Guidelines on cyber security onboard ships”. The development of the BIMCO Cyber Security Clause has been an important part of this initiative.

The clause has been written by a small drafting team, led by Inga Frøysa of Klaveness, with representatives from shipowners, P&I clubs and a law firm, and will be published towards the end of May.

“I am very pleased to see BIMCO as the first mover on this important topic. Recent years have shown that there is a clear need for a clause addressing the contractual issues that can arise from a cyber security incident,” says Inga Frøysa.

Sharing relevant information

The clause is drafted in broad and generic language which allows for it to be used in a wide range of contracts and in a string of contracts for easy back-to-back application. It is hoped that the clause will assist parties in obtaining affordable insurance for their cyber security exposure, as the clause introduces a cap on the liability for breaches.

“It was very important to the subcommittee to impose an obligation on the parties to keep each other informed if a cyber security incident should occur, and to share any relevant information, which could assist the other party in mitigating and resolving an incident as quickly as possible,” Frøysa says.

This is done through a two-fold notification process. Firstly, through an immediate notification from the party who becomes aware of an incident to the other party. Secondly, through a more detailed notification once the affected party has had the chance to investigate the incident.

The clause also requires the parties to always share subsequent information, which could assist the other party in mitigating or preventing any effects from the incident.

The level of required cyber security will depend on many elements such as the size of the company, its geographical location and nature of business.

The clause takes this into account by stipulating that the parties must implement “appropriate” cyber security. The clause also requires each party to use reasonable endeavors to ensure that any third-party providing services on its behalf in connection with the contract, has appropriate cyber security.

SOURCE BIMCO


ASIAN GYPSY MOTH FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Frequently asked questions (FAQ)

Q1: What are the risks related to the introduction of AGM?
Q2: Why does the maritime industry have a role in managing AGM risks?
Q3: Which ports are infested by AGM and at what time of the year
do the AGM females lay their eggs?
Q4: Which countries regulate and inspect arriving vessels for AGM?
Q5: What are the criteria for classifying a vessel as high risk of AGM?
Q6: What is required from a vessel that is classified as high risk of AGM?
Q7: Are the regulating countries performing AGM inspections all year round?
Q8: What happens if AGM egg masses are detected during port inspections?
Q9: What are the county specific requirements?
United States of America (US)
Canada
Chile
Australia
New Zealand
Q10: How can the crew reduce the vessel’s risk of AGM infestation?
Q11: Are there other relevant sources of AGM information?

The Asian Gypsy Moth (AGM) is a
destructive forest pest known to
spread via ocean-going vessels in
international trade. Vessels calling
at certain ports in the Asia Pacific
between May and September
should therefore be inspected
and “certified free of AGM” prior
to departure, this to minimise the potential for regulatory action when
arriving in a country where the pest is not native.

BACKGROUND

AGM is an exotic pest with established populations only in countries in the Asia Pacific, such
as Russia, China, Korea, and Japan. If introduced in countries where it does not exist naturally,
it has the potential to seriously affect the country’s agricultural and forest resources. Adult
moths frequently lay their egg masses on vessels and shipping containers, and since these
egg clusters often survive to hatch at ports of call around the world, exclusion efforts are
considered a priority by many local port authorities.
Preventing the introduction and spread of AGM is a shared responsibility that relies on
cumulative efforts at origin, en route and at arrival in port. However, it is the responsibility of
the ship operator to meet all port entry requirements related to AGM and managing the risk
at its origin to ensure that a vessel is free of AGM upon departure from ports in the infested
areas is recognised as the key measure.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS (FAQ)

General knowledge about the AGM and each country’s requirements on how to manage
AGM risks will minimise the potential for regulatory action and delays during port entries.
The purpose of this FAQ is therefore to provide answers to some of the AGM related
questions raised by Gard’s Members and clients, to summarises the requirements set forth by
each of the regulating countries and provide links to relevant government websites. The FAQ
also contains guidelines for how the crew can carry out systematic self-inspections onboard
the vessel while en route.

Q1: WHAT ARE THE RISKS RELATED TO THE INTRODUCTION OF AGM?

The United States has detected and eradicated many AGM infestations in the past and in an AGM pest alert from April 2016, their Department of Agriculture describes the risks as

follows: “Large infestations of AGM can completely defoliate trees, leaving them weak and
more susceptible to disease or attack by other insects. If defoliation is repeated for 2 or
more years, it can lead to the death of large sections of forests, orchards, and landscaping.
Any introduction and establishment of AGM in the United States would pose a major threat
to the environment and the urban, suburban, and rural landscapes.”

Q2: WHY DOES THE MARITIME INDUSTRY HAVE A ROLE IN MANAGING AGM RISKS?

Attracted to lights, the AGM females often lay their eggs on a vessel’s superstructure.
Vessels and cargo, such as containers, are therefore known to be involved in the artificial
spread of the pest by carrying the egg masses from one port to another. AGM egg
masses tolerate extremes in temperature and moisture, and the larvae can, under the
right conditions, hatch from an egg masse up to a year after it was attached to a vessel’s
structure. After hatching, the larvae travel great distances with the wind to find food and
may colonise in a new country if left unaddressed. It is therefore vital that the maritime
industry and relevant port authorities collaborate on measures to minimise the risk of AGM
incursions and implement procedures and policies emphasising vessel inspections.

Q3: WHICH PORTS ARE INFESTED BY AGM AND AT WHAT TIME OF THE YEAR DO
THE AGM FEMALES LAY THEIR EGGS?

AGM is found in Asia Pacific and there are high density populations in ports in East Russia,
Northeast China, Korea, and Japan. These AGM infested areas are also referred to as the
regulated areas or the risk areas.
The AGM flight season, when females lay their eggs, extends from May to September,
primarily from July to September in East Russia and northern Japan, from June to
September in Korea and China, from mid-May to mid-September in the remaining parts of
Japan depending on the specific port location. The AGM flight season is also referred to as
the specified risk period or the high-risk period in each of the regulated areas.

Q4: WHICH COUNTRIES REGULATE AND INSPECT ARRIVING VESSELS FOR AGM?

Countries where this pest is not native and that are currently known to regulate and inspect
arriving vessels for AGM are: the United States, Canada, Chile, Australia and New Zealand
(the regulating countries) and question Q9 below provides an overview of their relevant
requirements. However, authorities in other countries are also likely to be alert to the risk of
this invasive and destructive pest.

Q5: WHAT ARE THE CRITERIA FOR CLASSIFYING A VESSEL AS HIGH RISK OF AGM?

In general, and since the AGM larvae can hatch from egg masses up to a year after they
were laid/attached to the vessel, a vessel which has called at a port in a regulated area
during the specified risk period of the current or previous calendar year is considered high
risk of AGM. However, there is no uniform international definition of the regulated areas or
specified risk periods and we refer to Q9 and the country specific requirements for further
details.

Q6: WHAT IS REQUIRED FROM A VESSEL THAT IS CLASSIFIED AS HIGH RISK OF AGM?

The regulating countries generally require all arriving vessels to declare whether they have
traded to ports within the regulated areas in the current or previous specified risk period and
the need for an inspection will be determined based on an assessment of the vessel’s overall
AGM risk. Most regulating countries also require vessels to be certified free of AGM. Please
see Q9 for details about each country’s entry requirements.

Q7: ARE THE REGULATING COUNTRIES PERFORMING AGM INSPECTIONS ALL YEAR
ROUND?

Vessels entering a regulating country may be subject to inspection at any time of the year
to verify freedom from AGM. However, as the potential for larvae to hatch from egg masses
attached to a vessel in port, and spread, depends on the local climatic conditions at a
specific port, each of the regulating countries may specify certain periods of the year with
heightened surveillance and more systematic inspection for AGM. Please see Q9 for details
about each country’s inspection procedures.

Q8: WHAT HAPPENS IF AGM EGG MASSES ARE DETECTED DURING PORT
INSPECTIONS?

Actions imposed on the vessel depend on each country’s regulation, taking into account
climatic conditions at the time of entry as well as the degree of AGM infestation, and the
stage of development of the egg masses detected.
In some cases the vessel may be allowed to berth before being cleaned and handled with
insecticide spraying whilst alongside. In other cases, if the vessel’s itinerary indicate that the
presence of AGM life stages are possible and large amounts of egg masses that appear fresh
and viable for hatching are detected, the risk may be considered too high and the vessel can
be ordered to leave the country’s territorial waters immediately. In extreme cases, vessels
may be refused entry for up to two years during the AGM risk periods in that country (e.g.
Canada).

Q9: WHAT ARE THE COUNTY SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS?

Below is a summary of available information from each of the countries known to regulate
and inspect arriving vessels for AGM. Each country’s definition of AGM regulated areas
and specified risk periods as well as entry requirements and inspection procedures are
emphasised.

 

 

 


Maritime cyber risk management: boiling the ocean or storm in a tea cup?

 

Is the shipping industry’s most valuable commodity also its biggest risk?

As one of the world’s oldest industries, the shipping industry has capitalised on its capability to move assets around the world for thousands of years. Whether for trade, military or tourism, there are more than 50,000 ships world-wide that currently navigate our waters and facilitate both thriving economies and promote nation state security.

Know your risks and implement security measures

Our recent maritime report has explored the cyber security challenges that the maritime industry is facing now and will likely face in the future. With the increasing trend of attackers turning their attention to ships and shipping operations, more needs to be done to identify cyber risks at sea and mitigate them – a method to begin this process is to perform a risk assessment. Traditionally, a business might perform a risk-assessment periodically, say on a yearly basis, to identify what security risks need addressing, and follow this with implementing the right measures to protect against these risks occurring.

But what happens when your risk profile is constantly changing? All variables such as a ship’s cargo, employees and geography can change drastically within 24 hours as a ship makes its journey across the world and participates in trading. The main inputs to assessing risk are therefore constantly changing, significantly more than your standard business who needs to implement cyber security measures – so how is it feasible to have confidence that ships are implementing the right security in such a unique situation?

What are the key changing risk factors?

We have identified the main factors impacting cyber security that are associated with the constant movement of trade ships as follows:

  • Route: A ship relies on multiple navigation technologies to get it safely from point A to point B without damaging it, its cargo or risking life onboard. But what if malware could ever so slightly change measurements over time, à la Stuxnet. This would have little impact in the Pacific; but in the Panama Strait it would be catastrophic and the perfect attack for criminals to launch in order to then loot a ship.
  • Cargo: A ship will be carrying multiple cargos of different market value during its route and over time. These cargos may also have different value to different territories and groups.  Cargo systems can be compromised providing intelligence to criminals who can subsequently target specific cargo ships and resell on the black market. For example, pharmaceuticals would be an attractive target due their high value on the black market.
  • Piracy: There are certain areas of the world which may be at higher risk of attack from piracy, such as the seas that border Eastern Africa. Not only could the cargo training systems be tracked to identify when ships are carrying precious cargo like gold; we understand that pirates could also manipulate systems and spoof the position of ships in distress. This would result in a longer period of time for them to carry out their physical attacks.
  • Ports and business operations: Shipping staff may engage with multiple ports and succumb to various operational processes each time, notably payment and administration regarding docking. Threat groups have been known to track ships and spoof emails to shipping companies to request payment for their upcoming or previous docking. This has resulted in ships losing money as they have been unable to distinguish what is the legitimate process for these payments – made harder when a ship uses many ports over a short period of time.

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