CYBER SECURITY Archives - SHIP IP LTD

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DUBLINAug. 18, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The “Maritime Satellite Communication Market by Component (Solutions and Services), Solution (VSAT and MSS), Service (Tracking and Monitoring, Voice, Video, Data), End User (Merchant Shipping, Offshore, Government), and Region – Global Forecast to 2025” report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com’s offering.

The global maritime satellite communication market is expected to reach USD 3,251 million by 2025, growing at a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 7.1% during the forecast period.

The escalating need for enriched data communication to improve operation efficiency, on-board security, and surveillance, and employee/passenger welfare in the maritime industry is driving the market. Furthermore, The major factor driving the maritime satellite communication market is the need to attain improved connectivity between the land and sea operations and realizing benefits in faster repair times, preventative maintenance, fuel-saving, and real-time navigation.

Solutions segment to lead the maritime satellite communication market in 2020

As more and more commercial and government mariners are moving toward deploying satellite-based communication services, absolute communication technology is required. Solutions comprise two types of marine satellite communication VSAT and MSS. The players in the maritime satellite communication market are moving from MSS towards VSAT to offer clients with affordable communication services and increased bandwidth. Modernizing ship management systems to improve engine and systems maintenance, navigation, weather information, and cargo tracking is gaining momentum in maritime VSATapplications.

Merchant shipping segment among end-user to lead the maritime satellite communication market in 2020

Merchant shipping is mainly used for carrying passengers or cargo for commercial purposes. Owing to the necessity to operate ships efficiently, enhance overall business operation, and ensure crew loyalty and satisfaction, the crew owners are increasingly deploying maritime satellite communication systems. In recent years, satellite communication technology has become advanced, which enables ships to communicate through satellite links from anywhere globally without the help of a specialist radio officer. This technological advancement helps merchants gain higher profit through reliable communication services that maintain operational efficiency.

APAC to lead the maritime satellite communication market in 2020

The maritime satellite communication market in APAC is the largest in terms of market size and is highly fragmented based on multi-currencies and multi-languages. The region comprises a diverse range of countries, from economically and technologically advanced countries, such as the UK and Germany, to severely debt-ridden countries, such as Greece and Austria. The UK, PolandSpain, and Germany are the leading countries in the European maritime satellite communication market. The total contactless spending has grown in these countries with the increasing circulation of contactless cards and terminals by card companies, such as Visa and Mastercard.

Research Coverage

The report segments the global maritime satellite communication market by component(solutions and services), Very Small Aperture Terminal (VSAT), end-user, and region. The report includes an in-depth competitive analysis of key players in the maritime satellite communication market, along with their company profiles, recent developments, and key market strategies.

Major vendors in the global maritime satellite communication market include Inmarsat (UK), Iridium Communications (US), Thuraya (UAEHughes Network Systems (US), KVH Industries (US), Viasat (US), Speedcast (Australia), ST Engineering (Singapore), NSSLGlobal (England), Marlink (France), ORBOCOMM (US), Navarino (Greece), Network Innovations (Canada), GTMaritime (England), AST Group (UK), Isotropic Networks (Wisconsin), Norsat International (Ontario), Satcom Global (Canada), Intelsat (US), and Orbit Communication Systems (Israel).

Key Topics Covered

1 Introduction
1.1 Introduction to COVID-19
1.2 COVID-19 Health Assessment
1.3 COVID-19 Economic Assessment
1.4 Objectives of the Study
1.5 Market Definition
1.6 Market Scope
1.7 Currency Considered
1.8 Stakeholders

2 Research Methodology

3 Executive Summary

4 Premium Insights
4.1 Attractive Opportunities in the Maritime Satellite Communication Market
4.2 Market, by Component and Region
4.3 Market, by Region
4.4 Market: Investment Scenario

5 Market Overview and Industry Trends
5.1 Market Dynamics
5.1.1 Drivers
5.1.1.1 New Satellite Systems and Data-Intensive Applications to Drive the Growth of the Market
5.1.1.2 Increased Technology Advancements and Less Expensive Technology Solutions
5.1.1.3 Growth in Bandwidth Requirements and Communication Needs
5.1.2 Restraints
5.1.2.1 Lack of Awareness About Advanced Maritime Satellite Services
5.1.2.2 Reliance on High-Cost Satellite Equipment
5.1.3 Opportunities
5.1.3.1 Increasing Demand for Broadband Connections and VSAT Connectivity
5.1.3.2 High-Throughput Satellites to Unlock Cloud and IoT Services
5.1.3.3 Unification of Satellites and Cellular Communication Technology
5.1.4 Challenges
5.1.4.1 Increasing Cybersecurity Attacks
5.1.4.2 Lack of Reliability and Flexibility of Satellite Communication
5.1.4.3 Coping Up With Rapidly Changing Technologies
5.2 Industry Use Cases
5.2.1 Use Case 1: Inmarsat Global Xpress Helped Eukor Car Carriers for Its Fleet of 27 Vessels
5.2.2 Use Case 2: Thuraya Helped Devor Technologies to Bring Reliable, High-Speed Internet Connection to Offshore Maritime Operator
5.2.3 Use Case 3: Viasat Helped M/Y Starfire in Delivering High-Speed Connectivity to Support Luxury Guest Experience
5.2.4 Use Case 4: NSSLGlobal Helped MOL LNG by Providing Reliable Services for Managing Fleet of 15 LNG Carriers
5.3 Impact of Disruptive Technologies
5.3.1 Internet of Things
5.3.2 5G

6 COVID-19 Impact on Maritime Satellite Communication Market

7 Maritime Satellite Communication Market, by Component
7.1 Introduction
7.2 Solutions

8 Maritime Satellite Communication Market, by Solution
8.1 Introduction
8.2 Very Small Aperture Terminal
8.3 Mobile Satellite Services

9 Maritime Satellite Communication Market, by Service
9.1 Introduction
9.2 Tracking and Monitoring
9.3 Voice
9.4 Video
9.5 Data

10 Maritime Satellite Communication Market, by End-user
10.1 Introduction
10.2 Merchant Shipping
10.3 Fishing
10.4 Passenger Ships
10.5 Leisure Vessel
10.6 Offshore
10.7 Government
10.8 Others

11 Maritime Satellite Communication Market, by Region
11.1 Introduction
11.2 North America
11.3 Europe
11.4 Asia-Pacific
11.5 Middle East and Africa
11.6 Latin America

12 Competitive Landscape
12.1 Introduction
12.2 Competitive Leadership Mapping
12.2.1 Visionary Leaders
12.2.2 Dynamic Differentiators
12.2.3 Innovators
12.2.4 Emerging Companies
12.3 Strength of Product Portfolio
12.4 Business Strategy Excellence
12.5 Ranking of Key Players

13 Company Profiles
13.1 Introduction
13.2 Inmarsat
13.3 Iridium Communications
13.4 Thuraya
13.5 Hughes Network Systems
13.6 KHV Industries
13.7 Viasat
13.8 Speedcast
13.9 ST Engineering
13.10 NSSLGlobal
13.11 Marlink
13.12 Orbcomm
13.13 Navarino
13.14 Network Innovations
13.15 GTMaritime
13.16 AST Group
13.17 Isotropic Networks
13.18 Norsat International
13.19 Satcom Global
13.20 Intelsat
13.21 Orbit Communication Systems
13.22 Right-To-Win

For more information about this report visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/r/7o30de


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DUBLINAug. 17, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — ResearchAndMarkets.com published a new article on the electric boat industry “Electric Boats 2020: Technological Improvements in Lithium Ion Batteries are Changing Maritime Industry Attitudes”

The maritime industry has traditionally viewed electric boats as impractical. This is due mainly to concerns that an electric motor would not be able to supply the increased amount of power needed to move a boat versus a car as well as fears that electric boats would not have the range to cover long distances. However, these attitudes are beginning to change with improvements in lithium ion battery technology along with an increased focus on sustainable alternatives to fossil fuels.

Yamaha recently launched a trial of its new HARMO system on the Otaru Canal in Hokkaido, Japan. HARMO integrates a twin electric boat motor with a next generation steering control system. Yamaha hopes to bring the HARMO system to the European market which is affected by increasing restrictions on the use of fossil fuel powered crafts on inland waterways. A Seattle based startup Zin Boats is also looking to prove that electric boats can be a practical and sustainable alternative to traditional boats. The Z2T and Z2R models use an all carbon fiber construction making them half the weight of a comparable craft while the BMW batteries offer a fast recharge and an 100 mile average range.

To see the full article and a list of related reports on the market, visit “Electric Boats 2020: Technological Improvements in Lithium Ion Batteries are Changing Maritime Industry Attitudes”

About ResearchAndMarkets.com
ResearchAndMarkets.com is the world’s leading source for international market research reports and market data. We provide you with the latest data on international and regional markets, key industries, the top companies, new products and the latest trends.

SOURCE Research and Markets


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The maritime space is now ready for disruption. A hundred years ago, a single ship was manned by 100 crew. Now, that’s just down to 15 or 30 at most. The trend continues as technology slowly replaces the jobs of seafarers.

Companies from startups to big businesses are developing autonomous ships that would run without a single crew on board. With today’s technology, these “crewless” vessel may soon roam the seven seas delivering cargoes to every port it calls to.

With the rise of artificial intelligence, augmented reality, virtual reality, smart data, 5G and the internet of things (IOT), these developments will serve as the building blocks for unmanned ships.

Human Error

Shipping accidents have plagued the oceans for many decades. Its not only costly but the effects like an oil spill lingers for decades. Human error is mostly at fault for they account 75% to 96% of marine accidents. Grounding, collision, fire, capsizing- you name them. Human element is involved.

Whenever a maritime incident occurs, the world turns its attention to shipping. This is because the magnitude is on a large scale and not only the environment is affected but human lives as well.

To minimize the human interface in a vessel, companies are racing to build autonomous ships. The “Captain” will be located somewhere on shore monitoring the vessel as it navigates. The ship itself will be packed with sensors aside from building it to be robust- able to withstand the toughest weather.

There are still debate as to the cost efficiency of unmanned ships since these will be very expensive to build including the technology required to run them. But since the human factor is taken out, crew expenses will also be removed. This includes seamen’s salary, their provision, insurance, living spaces, crew changes and many others. As the technology matures, autonomous tech may cost less as more robust and cheaper ones will be made available .

Automation

I asked my crew mates about unmanned vessels and they still believe that this will be possible after a hundred years. However, taking a second look about the equipment we have on board points to automation.

The Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) replaced the Radio Officer who was considered vital on board. He was very important that the ship is not allowed to sail without him. Then came the Electronic Chart Display and Information Systems (ECDIS) which replaced the paper charts. Many years ago, engineers would be on watch 24/7 inside the Engine Room. Now, we have Unmanned Machinery (UMS) Space where they can sleep all night in their cabins leaving the engine room without any person.

These developments- small as they may be, follows a trend of race to zero: reducing the number of people on board until only the machines are needed to keep them running. This may look like a long shot but with today’s technology, the future will be promising to those who are prepared.

What do you think of unmanned vessels?

Monitoring and running vessels will soon be made available using laptop or any mobile devices as the industry shifts to autonomous shipping.

Source: marinestartups


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Understanding GPS spoofing in shipping: How to stay protected

Knowing exactly where you’re sailing and where to sail next is the most important part of a vessel’s navigation which can be accomplished by the use of GPS. Yet, what happens when your GPS gets spoofed? GPS spoofing, often leading to GPS outages, causes major disruptions to the shipping industry impacting safe navigation, leading to paralyzed shipping lanes, collisions and untraceable attacks.

The US order, according to Reuters, states that federal agencies should implement a plant to test infrastructure systems within one year, commenting that “disruption or manipulation of these services has the potential to adversely affect the national and economic security of the United States.”

Following the agreement, the US Transportation Department will recommend a backup GPS system or systems by the end of the year, while the testing of 11 technologies in Massachusetts and Virginia will be completed by May.

Moreover, the Commerce Department’s National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) estimated in one study that “a hypothetical disruption to GPS could result in $30 day period.

Therefore, it is of great importance to test US’s GPS infrastructure. The Commerce Department is conducting its independent source of precision time available within 180 days to both the public and private sector to assist critical infrastructure owners and operators.

 

 

 

 


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Maritime cyber security, threats, trends, and relevant safeguards

Milan – Even more than within other sectors, across the maritime domain’s evolving landscape of real-time connectivity requirements, which provides data in order to optimize maritime operations and customer experience, there are increasing vulnerabilities onboard vessels, potentially leading to ever more disruptive incidents; in what follows, Giuseppe D’Agostino, Associate Cybersecurity & Privacy Partner at PwC, talks about the subject.

Maritime cyber security

Cyber Security is increasingly becoming a topic of great interest across all economic sectors. After all, the statistics speak for themselves: 30% of businesses believe there’s a high probability they could be target of a cyber attack (source: PwC Digital Trust Insights 2018); proceeds from cyber crime, particularly those of drug smuggling operations, are estimated to be close to 3,000 billion dollars (source: Serious & Organized Crime Threat Assessment); around 15% of companies indicated they had uncovered over 50 cyber incidents over the past year (source PwC Digital Trust Insights 2018), marking a trend that’s on the rise.

Figures regarding the consequences of cyber attacks are equally dire. For instance, data breaches at Yahoo in 2016, and at Equifax in 2017, resulted in 320 million dollars being knocked off its sale price, and in a 32% drop in its share value, respectively. Danish shipping and logistics giant Maersk fared not much better, following an attack employing NotPetya ransomware. It’s estimated that the significant impact on business that followed that incident translated to around $300 million in lost revenue. Analysis of concrete incidents such as these sheds some understanding on the potential economic aspects of a cyber attack, and indeed quantifies them.

The introduction of new technologies has opened new vulnerabilities for enterprises, which, therefore, require innovative approaches to cyber security. An overview of the global picture shows that by 2020 some 50 billion devices will be interconnected (Internet of Things), a trend that is reflected across the maritime domain, with exponential growth expected in the use of wearable devices and integrated sensors; 100% of new cars will, moreover, be connected by 2022; similarly the piece of news that stands out in the maritime sector has to be the upcoming launch of the world’s first autonomous ship, the Yara Birkeland.

Cyber criminals will try to exploit the vulnerabilities that new technologies inevitably carry, and companies are starting to plan for new control regimes as these new developments are rolled out. An analysis of this data clearly shows an increase in vulnerabilities and threats regarding Cyber Security, which results in a need to develop and implement a holistic approach to cyber security incidents, by acting on three separate levels: prevention, identification, and response.

In terms of prevention, for example, it is essential to integrate the principles of security and privacy within evolving business models, such as developing new services and systems (security by-design and by-default). Many studies have shown how the costs for the mitigation of a vulnerability grow exponentially as time elapses; solving a security bug in the development phase, for example, is clearly much easier and cheaper than working on a system in full operation. Another aspect related to the prevention of security incidents concerns external suppliers.

Maritime cyber security

The services provided by companies are becoming increasingly integrated within complex and geographically dispersed value chains, in which relations and data exchanges with third parties assume a predominant role. A company’s security, therefore, hinges on the security of the entire value chain. In addition, less structured suppliers increasingly constitute an entry point for attackers, making no company, however mature, immune from an attack.

No matter how effective the countermeasures implemented may be, it’s essential to be able to detect attacks in a timely manner. An example of how companies are addressing this need is in the setting up of ad hoc structures to perform monitoring and alerting; these structures are usually termed Security Operation Center (SOC) and are responsible for the collection, correlation and analysis of data in order to generate alerts and detect possible security breaches.

The GDPR, particularly the measures concerning data breach (which oblige violations of personal data to be reported within very short times), gives even greater emphasis to the importance of effective monitoring. The response to incidents, that is the containment and restoration of the components impacted, is crucial for damage containment. It is important to make use of adequate professional skills that can contain the incident quickly, ensure the collection of exhaustive data that can stand up in court, and understand the root cause as soon as possible, to ensure that it will not happen again in the future (lesson learned).

Figures show that in this context there are considerable possibilities for improvement, given that it’s estimated that, on average, it takes 197 days time to identify a data breach, and 69 days to contain it (source: 2018 IBM – Cost of a Data Breach Study). The growth in threats and attacks has made cyber threats one of the top 5 priorities for CEOs. In fact, firms often feel unprepared, and 57% of firms in Italy consider action in the field of Cyber Security & Data Protection a priority (source PwC Digital Trust Insights 2018).

In conclusion, the following 5 basic steps should form the basis of a strategic security program: 1. Ensure that Cyber Security strategy is aligned with business objectives and is adequately supported by the company management. 2. Identify the most critical data resources, and prioritize investments through risk analysis to anticipate threats. 3. Be aware of threats (Intelligence), their motivations, resources and methods of attack, to reduce the time between detection and response to an incident 4. Evaluate Cyber Security of third parties and partners across the value chain, ensuring compliance with security policies and procedures 5. Provide training for employees and collaborate with others to raise awareness of Cyber Security threats and response techniques. Increasing knowledge and understanding of the threats and actions to be taken will allow companies and enterprises to improve their resilience. The ability to respond effectively to these challenges will increasingly be a key distinguishing factor in the future, which will reward companies able to provide reliable cyber-ready services on the market, thus turning measures aimed at avoiding risks into true business opportunities.

Maritime cyber security, threats, trends, and relevant safeguards

SOURCE : THEMEDI TELEGRAPH


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On 12  May 2017 cyber-security hit public consciousness in a big way when Wannacry ransomware brought down the NHS as the worm-driven malware spread around the globe hitting hundreds of thousands of computers.

Then security researcher Malwaretech, AKA Marcus Hutchins, registered a domain that acted as a kill switch, making him a hero. SC Media UK was happy to give him an award for his achievement, and later when his exploits brought him to the attention of law enforcement and he was arrested in the US for teenage black-hat hacking, creating code that was used in banking malware, SC suggested that he’d done enough to deserve a pardon. Ultimately the judge in his court case took a similar view.

The story is now told in a highly watchable documentary, WANNACRY: THE MARCUS HUTCHINS STORY, on Unlocked,  the online magazine for digital culture created by Kaspersky and available on YouTube.  Well worth viewing.


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Shipmanager Anglo-Eastern has inked a Memorandum of Understanding with Naval Dome for the provision of cyber security research and consultancy services, aimed at ensuring the continued cyber resilience of its fleet of more than 650 vessels.

Naval Dome will carry out an evaluation of the company’s cyber position, perform penetration testing and make recommendations, where necessary, on how systems can be better protected.

“Cyber threats are amongst the most serious challenges the global shipping industry faces and we share Naval Dome’s view that the industry at large must do more to protect itself,” said Capt. Bjorn Hojgaard, CEO of Anglo-Eastern.

“The MoU we have signed aims not only to enhance the level of security across our fleet, but to also encourage system providers to retrofit systems installed aboard the global fleet with more advanced cyber protection.”

As part of the agreement, Anglo-Eastern will also engage Naval Dome to collaborate with equipment manufacturers and technology service providers and push them to incorporate more effective security systems into shipboard equipment.

“We are delighted to sign this cooperation agreement with Anglo-Eastern,” said Naval Dome CEO Itai Sela.

“All ships must operate with equipment capable of preventing the most sophisticated of attacks from penetrating critical systems. As such, we believe that all players – ship owners, ship managers, offshore operators, and OEMS – need to collaborate more on how best to cost-effectively eradicate the problem once and for all. We hope equipment suppliers will step up to the challenge.”


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Maritime Cyber Security – Naval Dome CEO Itai Sela says that while it is true that the inadvertent downloading of a computer virus from the internet or a memory stick is a serious cyber security issue for shipping companies, the industry should be wary of attributing system breaches to human error.

In agreement with comments made yesterday in Dubai during a Cyber Risk and Data Theft seminar, that cyber security is still considered by shipping companies and terminal operators as an after-thought, Sela does not agree that better cyber awareness, crew training or the implementation of crew guidelines alone will have a lasting positive effect.

“When the cyber-criminal will always need the unwitting assistance of an unsuspecting crew member, technician or employee to activate or spread the virus, irrespective of the level of their cyber training or awareness, it is not enough to put it under the ‘human factor’ umbrella or apportion individual blame when a critical system has been breached.

“A cyber incident happens because systems are not protected, and hackers will continue to develop innovative ways and sophisticated solutions intended to take advantage of any weak spots in human nature. The implication, therefore, is that any cyber awareness training is a waste of time and money.”

The sophisticated methods hackers use is evident by the deployment of a new, previously unknown malware trojan called xHunt, which researchers at Palo Alto Networks’ Unit 42 say is being used to specifically target the shipping industry. It is alleged that xHunt and Hisoka – a backdoor used to facilitate trojan delivery – were successful in infiltrating the networks of two shipping companies operating out of Kuwait.

“The attackers have added some fun capabilities to Hisoka and its associated toolset. The attackers are aware of probable security measures in place at their targets and have attempted to develop ways to get in undetected,” Ryan Olson, Vice President of threat intelligence at Unit 42, told ZDNet.

Given that hackers will always find a way in, Sela believes attributing blame to individuals is pointless. It is also problematic because of the potential legal proceedings envisioned should a virus result in damage to the ship, its systems, personnel or the environment.

Maritime Cyber Security !

“It would be very easy to point the finger at an individual crew member, technician or employee for inadvertently spreading malware or other viruses, but this would not prevent further system breaches. What it will do is create unnecessary friction between employers and employees.”

He adds that limiting crew members’ access to the internet, social media or mobile phone charging facilities will also create problems.

“Prohibiting internet access is not the answer. This is now considered a basic human right and with many seafarers away from loved ones for months at a time, if they are unable to maintain regular contact with those at home, then not only could it adversely affect their well-being but deter others from a maritime career.”

Sela says the maritime sector – shipping companies and port operators – needs to adopt technical solutions to prevent system hacking, rather than simply implementing a culture change.

Recalling incident where a Mobile Offshore Drilling Unit lost control of its Dynamic Positioning system while drilling in the Gulf of Mexico, Sela says the investigation found that various crew members introduced malware when they plugged in their smart phones, and other devices.

“Would this have been considered human error if the DP and associated OT systems were adequately protected and the hack thwarted? I doubt it. If cyber-crime continues to be designated a human factor event, then the industry does not fully grasp the cyber problem.”
Source: Naval Dome


IMO cyber crime.

The International Maritime Organization (IMO) is readying for the advent of automation in the shipping industry, with a major scoping exercise to safeguard against future disasters, including oil spills and collisions.

Speaking at the regional Spillcon event held in Perth, Australia, in May, Patricia Charlebois, deputy director, Implementation Marine Environment Division, stressed the oil spill response community would need to consider new risk scenarios.

Charlebois told SAS that the IMO had a key strategic direction to integrate new and advancing technologies into its regulatory framework.

“Of course, cyber-risk management is very important as more and more systems become automated,” she said. “Whether you’re talking about an oil tanker or a different kind of ship, cyber-risk management should [play] a part .”

The IMO is now looking at how existing regulations might apply to ships with varying degrees of automation through a regulatory scoping exercise on Maritime Autonomous Surface Ships (MASS).

The IMO’s Maritime Safety Committee (MSC) agreed to examine how safe, secure, and environmentally sound operation of MASS could be introduced in IMO regulations in 2017 after a proposal by member states.

The scoping exercise includes a review of safety and maritime security (SOLAS); collision regulations (COLREG); loading and stability (Load Lines); training of seafarers and fishers (STCW, STCW-F) search and rescue (SAR); tonnage measurement (Tonnage Convention), and convention for safe containers (CSC).

IMO guidelines on maritime cyber-risk management set out procedures on how to safeguard shipping from current and emerging threats and vulnerabilities.

The guidelines, which cover digitisation, integration, and automation of processes and systems in shipping, identify bridge systems, propulsion and machinery management, power control, and communication systems among the most vulnerable to cyber attack.

The IMO aims to complete the scoping exercise by 2020. Meanwhile interim guidelines for MASS trials were approved in June.

IMO cyber crime

SOURCE


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Three cornerstones for effective Maritime cyber security

Maritime’s fragmented approach to digitalisation carries risk, especially when it comes to cyber security.

Speaking recently at Lloyd’s Register Asia Shipowners’ Forum, Wallem Group chief executive Frank Coles highlighted how operators can fail to update critical processes when embracing new onboard technologies. By overlooking the human elements of cyber security, he said, operators can undermine the potential benefits of acquiring a new technology – introducing risk instead capitalising on the rewards it can offer.

While cyber security risks posed to the shipping sector are real and pressing, they can be quantified and managed, if the right approach is taken.

Safeguarding critical assets in a fragmented digitalisation process and ensuring profitability in the years to come depends on three cornerstones:

Cornerstone 1: threat-intelligence assessment 

Maritime cyber security .

The cyber security landscape is rapidly changing and the insights gained as little as five years ago are of less and less value as threat actors adjust their approaches in response to advances made by security professionals and technical defenders. Regular threat intelligence and assessment activities allow an owner to view their organisation through the eyes of a potential attacker, to perceive their attack surface in detail, and to assess the real-world threats to their business.

Cornerstone 2: Crisis-management cyber attack simulation

With knowledge of the attack surface and adversaries already in hand, owners can take steps to safely, effectively and efficiently ensure they are prepared to respond to a cyber attack by using a simulated cyber attack known as a ‘red team’ exercise. Such exercises allow a company to define and simulate real-world attack scenarios using the same tactics, techniques, and procedures as a genuine threat actor. They also help determine the level of assurance and ability needed to effectively detect and respond to a genuine cyber attack and educate defence teams about effective responses within a controlled and forgiving environment.

Cornerstone 3: Define a cyber security strategy

An effective cyber security strategy completes the foundation of a secure technological and organisational infrastructure. Designing a cyber security strategy is a complex task for most firms as the strategy must be robust and responsive enough to address a dynamic operational environment. Security professionals can work to create a cyber security strategy to create operational efficiencies, maximum return on technology investments, and assured data and asset protection into the future.

Given the cost and reputational risks associated with a cyber attack – estimated at £11.7M (US$15.4M) per company according to a World Economic Forum 2017 study – there is no doubting the importance of taking a strategic approach to cyber security.

Ultimately, a truly cyber resilient shipping organisation is one that gains intelligence on evolving cyber threats to inform decisions and plans, going beyond the minimums needed to achieve compliance.

SOURCE https://www.marinemec.com


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