GENERAL Archives - SHIP IP LTD

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Leading fleet management software provider Tero Marine extends its e-procurement solution to mobile devices to optimize the supply chain for people on the move.

The versatile app automatically alerts users’ mobile devices when a PO requires their approval, within preset rules.

These rules are configured in TM Master’s approval matrix and can be based on a variety of  parameters including; order type, account group, cost code and vessel.

Rune Lyngaas, Tero Marine’s CEO, said:

“The new app improves the e-procurement work-flow as decision makers can approve purchase orders on the move, ensuring that supply chains are not hindered by POs stacking up in the pipeline awaiting authorization. The app strengthens Tero Marine’s TM Procurement solution, which is a fully integrated part of the fleet management software system TM Master V2.”

In an industry where autonomy and automation is emerging, the timing of the launch of this app is perfect. The new app is available from 1st June.

Tero Marine is part of the Ocean Technologies Group, which is a global learning and operational technology company dedicated to accelerating the potential of innovative companies that serve the maritime industry in the 21st Century.

The Group also includes maritime e-learning training providers Seagull, Videotel and Maritime Training Services plus document and HSEQ solutions provider COEX.

Source: https://seawanderer.org/tero-marine-enhances-its-e-procurement-solution-with-a-new-purchasing-app


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WASHINGTONMay 29, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Today Jennifer Carpenter, President & CEO of the American Waterways Operators, testified before the House Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation on the status of the U.S. maritime supply chain during the COVID-19 pandemic.

In written testimony submitted to the Subcommittee, Mrs. Carpenter framed her analysis in terms of three overarching messages:  1) the U.S. domestic maritime supply chain is resilient; 2) business continuity does not – and cannot – mean business as usual, especially where health and safety are concerned; and, 3) Congress has a vital role to play in ensuring the stability of the public policy pillars that create the foundation for the supply chain’s resilience and the nation’s recovery.

On supply chain resilience, Mrs. Carpenter emphasized that the American tugboat, towboat and barge industry is playing a key role in keeping the nation’s economy afloat, continuing to transport vital commodities and guiding ships safely into port. Mrs. Carpenter stated: “While cargo volumes in many sectors have declined due to depressed demand, mariners have continued to report to work, vessels have continued to operate, and the industry has adapted to maintain operational continuity and readiness.”

Mrs. Carpenter also observed that a critical component of maintaining operational continuity during the pandemic has been the early prioritization of crewmember health and safety: “The industry’s extensive experience with contingency planning, safety management systems and incident command structures has served it well in managing the health, safety and operational challenges posed by the pandemic. A tow on the river or an articulated tug-barge unit at sea for two to four weeks at a time is effectively a self-quarantined environment, and companies quickly put in place – and have continued to refine – procedures aimed at keeping the virus off their vessels.”

When discussing Congress’s role in supporting the maritime supply chain, Mrs. Carpenter noted there are: “…four pillars that enable the tugboat, towboat and barge industry to do the essential work it does for American shippers and the American economy. Those pillars – the Jones Act; modern, well-maintained ports and waterways infrastructure; a nationally consistent system of laws and regulations governing vessels in interstate commerce; and maritime safety – are more important than ever amid the circumstances of the COVID-19 pandemic.”

Mrs. Carpenter concluded: “The U.S. domestic maritime supply chain is resilient, and the tugboat, towboat and barge industry is well equipped to continue to serve our nation as we begin the long road to recovery from the economic disruption caused by this global public health crisis.”

Mrs. Carpenter’s full written testimony to the House Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation is available here.

About the American Waterways Operators

The American Waterways Operators is the national trade association representing the tugboat, towboat and barge industry, which operates on the rivers, the Great Lakes, and along the coasts and in the harbors of the United States. Barge transportation serves the nation as the safest, most environmentally friendly and most economical mode of freight transportation. www.americanwaterways.com

SOURCE American Waterways Operators

Related Links

http://www.americanwaterways.com


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Recently, the third and final Air Warfare destroyer, appropriately named HMAS Sydney was commissioned into the Royal Australian Navy.

This was a very significant moment on many levels for Australia and for its allies in the Asia-Pacific region.

For this is not just about what a single Air Warfare destroyer capable of doing; it is about what it can do when operating as part of the broader maritime kill web, either to defend Australia out to its first island chain, or to contribute to a wider set of defense challenges in the region an beyond.

The Air Warfare destroyer is a key foundation for the new wave of Australian shipbuilding, one in which mission systems and integratable is a key requirement.

It is also about learning from that build process to set in motion a new approach, which I have highlighted in my report on the new build offshore patrol vessel.

In an article which I published in USNI Proceedings in 2012, I highlighted the coming of the kill web in my concept of the long reach of Aegis. The ADF in embracing the fifth-generation revolution and the opportunity to reshape the ADF along the lines of an integratable force, views the coming of the Air Warfare Destroyer not simply in terms of a powerful new platform for the Navy, but as a contribution to the integrated distributed force.

As RAAF Air Vice Marshal Chipman, now the Australian Military Representative to NATO and the European Union put it earlier in an interview:

“We need to have broad enough of a perspective so that we can drive programs towards joint outcomes.

“For example, it will be crucial to bring E-7, with F-35 and air warfare destroyers into a common decision-making space so that we can realise built in capabilities for integrated air and missile defense.”

“And that needs to be informed by shaping a common perspective with the USN and USAF as well.

Source: https://sldinfo.com/2020/05/the-coming-of-the-air-warfare-destroyer-to-australia-a-key-maritime-kill-web-building-block/


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WASHINGTONMay 29, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Today Jennifer Carpenter, President & CEO of the American Waterways Operators, testified before the House Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation on the status of the U.S. maritime supply chain during the COVID-19 pandemic.

In written testimony submitted to the Subcommittee, Mrs. Carpenter framed her analysis in terms of three overarching messages:  1) the U.S. domestic maritime supply chain is resilient; 2) business continuity does not – and cannot – mean business as usual, especially where health and safety are concerned; and, 3) Congress has a vital role to play in ensuring the stability of the public policy pillars that create the foundation for the supply chain’s resilience and the nation’s recovery.

On supply chain resilience, Mrs. Carpenter emphasized that the American tugboat, towboat and barge industry is playing a key role in keeping the nation’s economy afloat, continuing to transport vital commodities and guiding ships safely into port. Mrs. Carpenter stated: “While cargo volumes in many sectors have declined due to depressed demand, mariners have continued to report to work, vessels have continued to operate, and the industry has adapted to maintain operational continuity and readiness.”

Mrs. Carpenter also observed that a critical component of maintaining operational continuity during the pandemic has been the early prioritization of crewmember health and safety: “The industry’s extensive experience with contingency planning, safety management systems and incident command structures has served it well in managing the health, safety and operational challenges posed by the pandemic. A tow on the river or an articulated tug-barge unit at sea for two to four weeks at a time is effectively a self-quarantined environment, and companies quickly put in place – and have continued to refine – procedures aimed at keeping the virus off their vessels.”

When discussing Congress’s role in supporting the maritime supply chain, Mrs. Carpenter noted there are: “…four pillars that enable the tugboat, towboat and barge industry to do the essential work it does for American shippers and the American economy. Those pillars – the Jones Act; modern, well-maintained ports and waterways infrastructure; a nationally consistent system of laws and regulations governing vessels in interstate commerce; and maritime safety – are more important than ever amid the circumstances of the COVID-19 pandemic.”

Mrs. Carpenter concluded: “The U.S. domestic maritime supply chain is resilient, and the tugboat, towboat and barge industry is well equipped to continue to serve our nation as we begin the long road to recovery from the economic disruption caused by this global public health crisis.”

Mrs. Carpenter’s full written testimony to the House Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation is available here.

About the American Waterways Operators

The American Waterways Operators is the national trade association representing the tugboat, towboat and barge industry, which operates on the rivers, the Great Lakes, and along the coasts and in the harbors of the United States. Barge transportation serves the nation as the safest, most environmentally friendly and most economical mode of freight transportation. www.americanwaterways.com

SOURCE American Waterways Operators


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Without a rudder, food, water, electricity, lights, wi-fi, refrigeration, GPS, security or safety lights, 15 seafarers sit at anchor in Manila Bay, Philippines. Abandoned on board the Spanish-flagged MV Celanova (IMO 9268394).

With batteries running low on their mobile phones, the crew who are trapped 13 nautical miles out at sea have been making calls for urgent assistance as the vessel is running dangerously low on fuel and diesel oil and the food, fresh water and medicines that the seafarers need to survive.

Without a rudder, food, water, electricity, lights, wi-fi, refrigeration, GPS, security or safety lights, 15 seafarers sit at anchor in Manila Bay, Philippines. Abandoned on board the Spanish-flagged MV Celanova (IMO 9268394).

With batteries running low on their mobile phones, the crew who are trapped 13 nautical miles out at sea have been making calls for urgent assistance as the vessel is running dangerously low on fuel and diesel oil and the food, fresh water and medicines that the seafarers need to survive.

In an earlier email one crew member wrote to the ITF asking when they could get fresh food on board. “We are eating something that three months ago we would have never thought we would have to eat,” she texted.

“Since February 21, when I was first informed of the case, there have been thousands of WhatsApp messages,” said Luz Baz, ITF Coordinator, Spain. “I’m in touch with them daily. But now the ship is in total blackout.”

Crew have been sleeping on deck as there is no air conditioning, but storms on Sunday night forced the seafarers to take shelter in the dark below deck, she said.

The 7600 gross tonnage MV Celanova is a Spanish flagged LPG tanker owned by GLOBALGAS SA, Madrid, Spain. The company has left the crew without pay for months and begging for vital provisions.

Alarmingly the LPG tanker was forced to discharge its dangerous cargo of Butadiene gas to another vessel on March 7, as the vessel was running out of the bunker fuel needed to keep the gas refrigerated.

On December 7, the tanker broke down and lost its rudder off the Philippines coast. Ten days later it was towed to anchor in Manila Bay.

Philippines Port State Control detained the vessel on 14 February after authorities found it to be in breach of the International Labour Organization (ILO) Maritime Labor Convention (MLC) over unpaid wages following notification by the ITF.

The ITF is urgently requesting Filipino authorities to allow the ship into port to facilitate assistance from the flag state and the vessels insurers, the American Club.

Local authorities have agreed but only on condition a tug is provided alongside the tanker and on standby while she is moored.

“I’ve worked over 14 years as an ITF inspector, I have dealt with many abandoned vessels so far and this is the first time someone has asked crew pay tug hire,” Baz said.

“The ship needs to be in port. The crew can’t start the engine. Something has to be done. The crew are desperate. They need fuel, fresh water, provisions, medication, safety parts,” she said.

Some of the Spanish and Caribbean crew have been on board since August, others since November.

Further exacerbating the seafarers’ plight, Spanish mortgage bank ABANCA is reportedly frustrating attempts to sell the vessel to help finance the owner’s debts.

Baz wrote to Maritime Authorities in Manila warning the ship and its crew were at enormous risk of potential anchor drift, fire on board or accident due to having no capacity to maneuver.

“The situation is seriously compromising the safety and health of a crew. They are exhausted after suffering months of enormous stress,” she wrote.

Despite the Philippines being a signatory to the MLC requiring governments to facilitate crew repatriation during abandonment, no action has been taken.

Their plight is further complicated by the COVID-19 pandemic.

The ILO abandonment report says communications have been maintained with the ship’s owner and instructions have been given to provide food and fuel.

A flag state surveyor was on board from February 27 to March 2 to check the real situation, the ILO reported. The Spanish Maritime Administration is focused on getting crew members repatriated working together with all stakeholders including the ITF.

The Spanish government has also contacted the Philippines government requesting the ship be docked in safe port according to ILO reports.

Ship’s master Rolando Garcia Alarcon warned the ILO the ship has serious technical deficiencies. He requested authorisation for the ship to berth, based on humanitarian and safety reasons citing the ship being without a rudder, fuel and lights. The master also reported the vessel’s chains and anchors were damaged. Garbage on deck also poses a health risk and the crew and ship especially in the case of fire, he said.

The ITF has written to the International Labour Organization requesting their intervention.

Reference: itfglobal.org


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During April, there were zero new detentions of foreign flagged vessels in a UK port.

  1. In response to one of the recommendations of Lord Donaldson’s inquiry into the prevention of pollution from merchant shipping, and in compliance with the EU Directive on Port State Control (2009/16/EC as amended), the Maritime and Coastguard agency (MCA) publishes details of the foreign flagged vessels detained in UK ports each month.
  2. The UK is part of a regional agreement on port state control known as the Paris Memorandum of Understanding on Port State Control (Paris MOU) and information on all ships that are inspected is held centrally in an electronic database known as THETIS. This allows the ships with a high risk rating and poor detention records to be targeted for future inspection.
  3. Inspections of foreign flagged ships in UK ports are undertaken by surveyors from the Maritime and Coastguard Agency. When a ship is found to be not in compliance with applicable convention requirements, a deficiency may be raised. If any of their deficiencies are so serious, they have to be rectified before departure, then the ship will be detained.
  4. All deficiencies should be rectified before departure.
  5. When applicable, the list includes those passenger craft prevented from operating under the provisions of the EU Directive on a system of inspections for the safe operation of Ro-Ro passenger ships and high-speed passenger craft in regular service and amending directive 2009/16/EC and repealing Council Directive 1999/35/EC (Directive EU 2017/2110).

Notes on the list of detentions:

  • Full details of the ship:
    The accompanying detention list shows ship’s International Maritime Organization (IMO) number which is unchanging throughout the ship’s life and uniquely identifies it. It also shows the ship’s name and flag state at the time of its inspection.
  • Company:
    The company shown in the vessel’s Safety Management Certificate (SMC) or if there is no SMC, then the party otherwise believed to be responsible for the safety of the ship at the time of inspection.
  • Classification society:
    The list shows the classification society responsible for classing the ship only.
  • Recognised organisation:
    Responsible for conducting the statutory surveys: and issuing statutory certificates on behalf of the flag state.
  • White (WL), grey (GL) and black lists (BL) are issued by the Paris MoU on 01 July each year and shows the performance of flag state.
  • Deficiencies:
    The deficiencies listed are the ones which were detainable.

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The Tokyo MOU has released its Annual Report on Port State Control in the Asia-Pacific Region noting that the number of detentions was up in 2019 after seven years of decline.

Detention percentage also increased in 2019 after 10 continuous years’ decrease. The number of under-performing ships published and number of individual ships involved also rose in 2019. “These increases are considered as the encouraging outcome of improvement and enhancement on targeting or selecting ships for inspections and, emphasis on inspection of under-performing ships by the member Authorities, based on the observation of continuous increase of inspections of high risk ships and under-performing ships,” states the report.

ISM related detainable deficiencies have remained in the top three detainable deficiency categories for several years. One third of all detentions are on the grounds of a major non-compliance with ISM.

The average number of detainable deficiencies per detention is trending slowly upwards. As a result the Tokyo MOU will refine measures to inspect under-performing ships. These inspections will focus on the safety management system implemented on board ships and familiarization and understanding of operational requirements by the crew. Operational requirements continue to be an area of concern due to the increasing complexity of shipboard systems and the pace of change, and the MOU is looking at mechanisms to address this.

The MOU’s concentrated inspection campaign (CIC) on Emergency Systems and Procedures was conducted from September 1 to November 30, with 7,174 CIC inspections. The most notable deficiencies found during the campaign were related to the muster list details in accordance with the requirements (178 deficiencies, 2.48 percent), emergency source of the electrical power supply to essential equipment (151 deficiencies, 2.10 percent), damage control plan readily available (137 deficiencies, 1.91 percent), steering gear system and its related emergency alarm operation (127 deficiencies, 1.77 percent) and capability of the public address system (112 deficiencies, 1.56 percent). Fifty-five ships were detained as a direct result of the CIC, which represents a percentage of 0.77 percent, lower than the overall detention percentage of 2.62 percent for the same period.

Membership of Tokyo MOU was further expanded in 2019 upon with the acceptance of Panama as the 21st full member of the MOU. With Panama, four of the top five world largest flags (Panama, Marshall Islands, Hong Kong and Singapore) are members of the Tokyo MOU.

The report is available here.


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The foreign ministers of Greece, Cyprus, Egypt, France and the United Arab Emirates denounced the “ongoing Turkish illegal activities” in Cyprus’ exclusive economic zone (EEZ) and its territorial waters, during a teleconference on Monday to discuss the latest developments in the Eastern Mediterranean, as well as a number of regional crises that threaten peace and stability in this region.

In their joint declaration issued after the teleconference, the ministers said these activities represent “a clear violation of international law” as reflected in the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea.

Turkey is currently in its sixth attempt in less than a year to conduct drilling operations in Cyprus’ maritime zones.

The five ministers also condemned the escalation of Turkey’s violations of the Greek national airspace, including over flights of inhabited areas and territorial waters.

The ministers also discussed and condemned “the instrumentalization” of migrants by Turkey in an attempt to illegally cross Greek land borders as well as “its continued support for illegal crossings” of Greek sea boundaries.

Concerning Libya, they reiterated that the two memorandums of understanding signed in November 2019 between Ankara and UN-recognized National Accord Government Fayez Al Sarraj are respectively in contravention of international law and the UN arms embargo in Libya.

Source:
https://www.ekathimerini.com/252566/article/ekathimerini/news/greece-cyprus-egypt-france-uae-denounce-turkish-activities-in-eastmed


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MIAMIMay 12, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Tritan Software, the #1 Provider of Health & Safety technology platforms in the maritime industry,  announced today the launch of SeaConsult, a new telehealth solution that will be provided at no cost to all clients during the COVID-19 pandemic period. SeaConsult will allow onboard staff to securely conduct virtual cabin visits with onboard crew and guests for all suspected cases directly via a laptop or mobile device.  The ability to perform contactless visits and checks via telehealth, in accordance with the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations, will help prevent the transmission of communicable diseases onboard while ensuring the safety of crew and passengers. SeaConsult will also provide the ability for staff onboard to seek consult directly with shoreside specialists when additional medical assistance is needed.

More than 95% of the cruise industry has already adopted Tritan’s SeaCare® Health Platform; SeaConsult will be directly integrated into this existing system, allowing for immediate deployment across an entire industry. “As the leader in the industry, we believe it is our obligation to assist our clients and our communities during this challenging period,” stated Andrew L. Carricarte, President and CEO of Tritan Software. “This latest advancement brings a much-needed and immediate capability to an entire industry. We have been collaborating extensively and working tirelessly with them and various regulatory authorities to ensure that the safety of all crew and passengers is paramount.” Tritan will be leveraging its patented technology, SeaSync®, to ensure that the virtual telehealth tool will operate effectively within the industry’s limited connectivity environment at sea.

Tritan Software has also recently announced a new version which will provide additional innovative tools in compliance with the latest regulatory standards, along with numerous COVID-19-focused enhancements to assist with operational management. SeaCare®, a GDPR- and HIPAA-compliant platform, currently provides a comprehensive suite of modules for every aspect of maritime care and health management. This includes numerous public health and communicable disease management tools such as automated close-contact tracing, quarantine management, epicurve trending, outbreak prevention notifications and the integration of critical compliance requirements to the numerous global authorities such as the CDC, U.S. Coast Guard, ECDC, Health Canada, Chinese Ministry of Health, Anvisa and various others entities.

About Tritan Software

Tritan Software is the maritime industry’s #1 provider of health and safety management platforms. Tritan Software has over 95% adoption amongst all cruise lines with a rapidly growing presence within the commercial segments of the industry. Our products – the SeaCare® Health Platform, the SeaEvent® Management Platform and the SeaSafe® Management Platform – combine patented synchronization technology and highly specialized functionality to deliver an unmatched value proposition resulting in optimal operational outcomes. Tritan Software has clients operating in every ocean of the world, sailing to over 1,000+ ports with over four million events being managed within its software platforms annually.

SOURCE Tritan Software


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The US Department of Transportation’s Maritime Administration (MARAD) has issued a new warning of vessel attacks in the Southern Gulf of Mexico.

MSCI Advisory 2020-008 states that the U.S. government is aware of at least 20 fishing vessels and 35 oil platforms and offshore supply vessels that have been targeted by pirates and armed robbers since January 2018 in the Bay of Campeche area of the southern Gulf of Mexico. Significant underreporting of attacks in this area is suspected.

These attacks have involved the discharge of firearms, crew injuries, hostage taking, and theft. At least five of these attacks occurred in April 2020, details of which are provided in the Office of Naval Intelligence’s 30 April 2020 Worldwide Threat to Shipping (WTS) report, available at https://go.usa.gov/xv7tF.

The advisory goes on to warn that the pirates/robbers targeting offshore infrastructure and vessels in this area typically operate in small groups of between 5 and 15 individuals aboard several boats. They usually employ small fiberglass hulled craft, similar in appearance to local artisanal fishing boats, equipped with multiple high-powered outboard motors that enable fast travel to the oil fields located between five and ninety-five nautical miles offshore. They typically carry out their raids under the cover of darkness so that their approach is masked and so that they can use platform lights to navigate towards their target. The attackers are reportedly armed with an assortment of weapons including assault rifles, shotguns, pistols, machetes, knives and tools. They are known to use violence to ensure compliance and prevent resistance.

United States Guidance

MARAD advises to remain vigilant and to ensure familiarity with and adherence to their approved Vessel Security Plan when operating in this area. The Department of State’s Mexico Travel Advisory (available at https://go.usa.gov/xvVcB) should also be thoroughly reviewed prior to operating in this area. In addition, all suspicious activities and events involving U.S. flagged vessels must be reported to the U.S. Coast Guard National Response Center at 800-424-8802 in accordance with 33 CFR 101.305.

Reporting

Suspicious activity and attacks in this region should be reported to the Mexican Navy’s Third Naval Region Campeche at +52 981 812 0881 or rn3@semar.gob.mx. Incident reports should be submitted in writing to the Regional Mexican Navy command within 24 hours in the Spanish language.

Further Information

Read North’s guidance on maritime security here.

Members can access maritime security information and alerts on MyGlobeView here.

Source:
https://www.nepia.com/industry-news/usa-issues-maritime-security-advisory-for-southern-gulf-of-mexico/