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ABS has published a new whitepaper on Autonomous Vessels to support the industry’s increasing adoption of autonomous capabilities with a focus on safe implementation, which sets out 10 goals to create a framework for the design and operation of autonomous vessels and addresses key issues in implementation.

The whitepaper also includes an update on the outcome of the IMO’s Maritime Autonomous Surface Ships (MASS) Regulatory Scoping Exercise, an important step on the road toward the development of requirements governing autonomous operations.

“To allow operations of fully autonomous vessels, the maritime industry requires regulations for their design. While this is an ongoing endeavor at the IMO, ABS is well placed to propose our own framework to support both safe innovation and adoption of autonomous technologies,” said Patrick Ryan, ABS Senior Vice President, Global Engineering and Technology.

Much progress has been made in the development of maritime autonomous technology in the last three years.  However, the technological and regulatory challenges vary depending on vessel type and size. As such, ABS notes and proposes a goal-based framework constructed from the ground-up for application to fully autonomous vessels.

The intent of the requirements contained in key regulations applicable to ship-design have been examined, namely the:

  • International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS, 1974, as amended), and
  • International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL).

Therefore, ABS has identified the following high-level safety goals.

  1. Maintain propulsion
  2. Maintain safety of vessel
  3. Protect against flooding
  4. Maintain safety of navigation
  5. Communicate distress
  6. Meet environmental concerns
  7. Provide continuous monitoring and situational awareness
  8. Maintain command and decision system
  9. Maintain safety of cargo
  10. Maintain communication with remote operations center

”As the industry endeavors to develop regulations and requirements for autonomous vessel design and operations, this paper has proposed a goal-based framework based on the intent of the requirements contained in current conventional regulations. This leverages on the wealth of experience which formed the basis of these regulations.”


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IMO will hold an Extraordinary Session of its Council to address the impacts on shipping and seafarers of the situation in the Black Sea and the Sea of Azov.

The Extraordinary Session (C ES 35) will be held on 10 and 11 March in remote session, and it was convened following requests from several Council Members. In light of the Ukraine-Russia tension, the IMO Secretary-General, Kitack Lim, issued a statement supporting the call of UN Secretary-General António Guterres for hostilities to cease immediately.

As IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim said:

As the humanitarian crisis continues to unfold in Ukraine, I fully support and stand with UN Secretary-General António Guterres’ call for hostilities to cease immediately


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1 April 2022

Adopted by MEPC 75:

Amendments to MARPOL Annex VI on sulphur content definition and sampling 

  • Amendments to Regulation 2 ‘Definitions’, to include new definitions for “Sulphur content of fuel oil” – meaning the concentration of sulphur in any fuel oil, measured in % m/m as tested in accordance with standard acceptable to the Organization; “Low-flashpoint fuel”, to mean gaseous or liquid fuel having a flashpoint lower than otherwise permitted under paragraph 2.1.1 of SOLAS regulation II-2/4; “MARPOL delivered sample”, to mean the sample of fuel oil delivered in accordance with regulation 18.8.1 of MARPOL Annex VI; “In-use sample”, to mean the sample of fuel oil in use on a ship; and “On board sample”, to mean the sample of fuel oil intended to be used or carried for use on board that ship.
  • Fuel oil sampling and testing – amendments to Regulation 14 ‘Sulphur oxides (SOX) and particulate matter’, to add new paragraphs related to in-use and onboard fuel oil sampling and testing, to add new paragraphs to require one or more sampling points to be fitted or designated for the purpose of taking representative samples of the fuel oil being used or carried for use on board the ship. The representative samples of the fuel oil being used on board are to be taken in order to verify the fuel oil complies with the regulation.
  • Appendix I amendments to the International Air Pollution Prevention (IAPP) certificate – Consequential amendments to update the IAPP certificate to add a reference to sampling points and also to note where there is an exemption to the provision for low-flashpoint fuel.
  • Appendix VI on the Fuel verification procedure for MARPOL Annex VI fuel oil samples consequential amendments to verification procedures, to cover verification of the representative samples of in-use fuel oil and on board fuel oil.

1 June 2022

Adopted by MEPC 75: 

Amendments to BWM Convention 

  • Amendments to the International Convention for the Control and Management of Ships’ Ballast Water and Sediments, 2004 (BWM Convention), concerning commissioning testing of ballast water management systems and the form of the International Ballast Water Management Certificate.

1 June 2022 – IMDG Code 40-20

Adopted by MSC 102:

  • Amendments to the International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code (IMDG Code) (amendment 40-20) related to segregation requirements for alcoholates; segregation in relation to liquid organic substances; classification and transport of carbon, following incidents involving the spontaneous ignition of charcoal; classification of UN portable tanks for multimodal transport; and provisions for labels.
1 November 2022 
Adopted by MEPC 76
  • Entry into force of  Revised MARPOL Annex VI  – including carbon intensity measures (requirements for ships to calculate their Energy Efficiency Existing Ship Index (EEXI) following technical means to improve their energy efficiency and to establish their annual operational carbon intensity indicator (CII) and CII rating – read more)
  • Entry into force of amendments to MARPOL Annex I (addition of a new regulation 43A) to introduce a prohibition on the use and carriage for use as fuel of heavy fuel oil (HFO) by ships in Arctic waters on and after 1 July 2024. The prohibition will cover the use and carriage for use as fuel of oils having a density at 15°C higher than 900 kg/m3 or a kinematic viscosity at 50°C higher than 180 mm2/s. Ships engaged in securing the safety of ships, or in search and rescue operations, and ships dedicated to oil spill preparedness and response would be exempted. Ships which meet certain construction standards with regard to oil fuel tank protection would need to comply on and after 1 July 2029. A Party to MARPOL with a coastline bordering Arctic waters may temporarily waive the requirements for ships flying its flag while operating in waters subject to that Party’s sovereignty or jurisdiction, up to 1 July 2029.
  • Entry into force of amendments to  MARPOL Annexes I and IV concerning the exemption of UNSP barges from survey and certification requirements. The amendment specifies that the Administration may exempt a UNSP barge from the annual survey and certification requirements, for a period not exceeding 5 years provided that the UNSP barge has undergone a survey to confirm that certain conditions are met. The amendments also provide the form for the International Oil Pollution Exemption Certificate for Unmanned Non-self-propelled Barges.
1 January 2023
Entry into effect of carbon intensity measures including CII (read more)
  • On or before 1 January 2023, the Ship Energy Efficiency Management Plan (SEEMP) shall include methodology for calculating the ship’s attained annual operational CII and the required annual operational CII.
  • Operational CII – After the end of calendar year 2023 and after the end of each following calendar year, each ship of 5,000 gross tonnage and above, shall calculate the attained annual operational CII over a 12-month period from 1 January to 31 December for the preceding calendar year.
  • The Attained annual operational CII shall be documented and verified against the required annual operational CII to determine operational carbon intensity rating A, B, C, D or E, indicating a major superior, minor superior, moderate, minor inferior, or inferior performance level, either by the Administration or by any organization duly authorized by it.
  • A ship rated D for 3 consecutive years or rated as E shall develop a plan of corrective actions to achieve the required annual operational CII.
1 January 2023 – STCW / ESP 
Adopted by MSC 103:
  • Amendments  to International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW), adding the definition of “high-voltage” in STCW regulation I/1.
  • Amendments to section A-I/1 of the STCW Code, including the capacity “electro-technical officer” in the definition of “operational level”, as a consequential amendment to the introduction of this capacity as part of the 2010 Manila Amendments.
  • Amendments to the International Code on the Enhanced Programme of Inspections during Surveys of Bulk Carriers and Oil Tankers, 2011 (ESP Code), relating to thickness measurements at the first renewal survey of double hull oil tanker.
1 January 2023
Adopted by MEPC 76:
  • Amendments to the IMO Convention for the Control of Harmful Anti-fouling Systems on Ships (AFS Convention), to include controls on the biocide cybutryne. Ships shall not apply or re-apply anti-fouling systems containing this substance from 1 January 2023. Ships shall remove or apply a coating to AFS with this substance at the next scheduled renewal of the anti-fouling system after 1 January 2023, but no later than 60 months following the last application to the ship of an anti-fouling system containing cybutryne.

1 January 2024 – SOLAS records of equipment, FSS code, IGF code, LSA code 

Adopted by MSC 101: 

  • Amendments to the appendix to the annex to the 1974 SOLAS, concerning the addition of a footnote to Forms C, E and P in the Records of Equipment.
  • Amendments to chapter 15 of the International Code for Fire Safety Systems (FSS Code), relating to inert gas systems.
  • Amendments to parts A and A-1 of the International Code of Safety for Ships using Gases or other Low-flashpoint Fuels (IGF Code), including those relating to regulations on loading limit for liquefied gas fuel tanks, regulations for fuel distribution outside of machinery space, regulations for internal combustion engines of piston type and fire protection for fuel storage hold space; and amendments relating to the protection of the fuel supply for liquefied gas fuel tanks, aimed at preventing explosions.
  • Amendments to chapters IV and VI of the International Life-Saving Appliance Code (LSA Code), relating to general requirements for lifeboats and launching and embarkation appliances.

Adopted by MSC 102: safe mooring  

 

  • Amendments to chapter II-1 of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS), related to towing and mooring. The amendments to SOLAS regulation II-1/3-8 (Towing and mooring equipment), require appropriate and safe-to-use designs of mooring arrangements, and introduce a maintenance and inspection regime, as well as proper documentation. Related  guidelines were also adopted, covering the design of mooring arrangements and the selection of appropriate mooring equipment and fittings for safe mooring; and inspection and maintenance of mooring equipment including lines; as well as revised guidance on shipboard towing and mooring equipment.
  • Amendments to parts B-1, B-2 and B-4 of SOLAS chapter II-1 related to watertight integrity requirements. The amendments are expected to enter into force on 1 January 2024.
  • Amendments to the International Code of Safety for Ships using Gases or other Low-flashpoint Fuels (IGF Code),  related to the fuel containment systems, fire safety, welding of metallic materials and non-destructive testing.
  • Amendments to the International Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships Carrying Liquefied Gases in Bulk (IGC Code), related to welding procedure tests for cargo tanks and process pressure vessels.

 

 

Adopted by MSC 103:

  • New SOLAS regulation II-1/25-1, requiring water level detectors on multiple hold cargo ships other than bulk carriers and tankers.
  • Amendments to SOLAS regulation III/33 and the LSA Code, aiming to remove the applicability of the requirements to launch free-fall lifeboats to test their strength with the ship making headway at speeds up to 5 knots in calm water on cargo ships of 20,000 GT and above.
  • Chapter 9 of the International Code for Fire Safety Systems (FSS Code), relating to fault isolation requirements for individually identifiable fire detector systems installed, in lieu of section identifiable fire detector systems on cargo ships and passenger ship cabin balconies; and clarifying the acceptability of less complex and costly section identifiable fault isolation for individually identifiable fire detector system on cabin balconies; and clarifying the acceptability of less complex and costly section identifiable fault isolation for individually identifiable fire detector systems.

 

 

 

Adopted by MSC 104:

  • A minor amendment to chapter II (Conditions of assignment of freeboard), as well as amendments to chapter III (Freeboards) of annex I (Regulations for determining load lines) of Annex B to the 1988 Load Lines Protocol, concerning watertight doors on cargo ships, and associated amendments concerning watertight doors on cargo ships to chapter 2 (Ship survival capability and location of cargo tanks) of the International Code of the Construction and Equipment of Ships Carrying Liquefied Gases in Bulk (IGC Code).

 

1 July 2024
Adopted by MEPC 76
  • Entry into effect of amendments to MARPOL Annex I (addition of a new regulation 43A) to introduce a prohibition on the use and carriage for use as fuel of heavy fuel oil (HFO) by ships in Arctic waters on and after 1 July 2024. The prohibition will cover the use and carriage for use as fuel of oils having a density at 15°C higher than 900 kg/m3 or a kinematic viscosity at 50°C higher than 180 mm2/s. Ships engaged in securing the safety of ships, or in search and rescue operations, and ships dedicated to oil spill preparedness and response would be exempted. Ships which meet certain construction standards with regard to oil fuel tank protection would need to comply on and after 1 July 2029. A Party to MARPOL with a coastline bordering Arctic waters may temporarily waive the requirements for ships flying its flag while operating in waters subject to that Party’s sovereignty or jurisdiction, up to 1 July 2029.

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Despite that COVID-19 continues to attracting a lot of our attention and making our lives difficult, 2022 is going to be a year of focus on the environment. Following COP26, the message is clear; we need to act now against the climate change and for the maritime industry, IMO has already paved the way with the enforcement of strict environmental rules; nonetheless, maritime safety will always be a key concern for the industry.

Let’s have a look at what to expect within this new year from a regulatory perspective

First reporting period for UK MRV

As a result of Brexit, EU MRV no longer applies to ships visiting UK ports. More specifically, the UK Government, in last September, released guidance on the application of its own scheme for monitoring, reporting and verifying (UK MRV) carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Ship operators should begin collecting emissions data for their ships under the UK MRV regime from 1 January 2022.

Ships over 5,000 gross tonnes, transporting cargo and/or passengers for commercial purposes to and from UK ports, between UK ports or within UK ports (including while at berth), are subject to the UK MRV regime. The same exceptions apply to vessels under the UK MRV regime (e.g. for warships), that apply under the EU MRV regime. Ship operators must have in place an assessed monitoring plan before data collection begins. The assessment of the monitoring plan and the verification of the annual emission report for each ship needs to be done by an accredited verifier. By 30 April following each reporting period, a verified emissions report must be submitted to the UK Administration covering the previous reporting period. By 30 June following each reporting period, a valid Document of Compliance (DoC) must be carried on board each vessel covering the previous reporting period.

SEEMP revision to include EEXI and CDI within 2022

During MEPC 76 in June 2021, the IMO adopted measures that will require all ships to calculate their Energy Efficiency Existing Ship Index (EEXI) following technical means to improve their energy efficiency and to establish their annual operational carbon intensity indicator (CII) and CII rating. The requirements will enter into force on 1st of January 2023, but until then, ship operators need to revise their Ship Energy Efficiency Management Plans (SEEMP) accordingly. In particular, the amendments to MARPOL Annex VI (adopted in a consolidated revised Annex VI) are expected to enter into force on 1 November 2022, with the requirements for EEXI and CII certification coming into effect from 1 January 2023. This means that the first annual reporting on carbon intensity will be completed in 2023, with the first rating given in 2024, IMO mentions.

A new era in SIRE inspection program

The new SIRE 2.0 by OCIMF is expected to become operational within 2022 and for the first time will take into consideration the human element to ensure inspectors are sensitive to all pressures onboard. It will feature the following four key areas of focus:

  1. Accuracy: Facilitating an accurate description of how key safety and operational risks are managed and verified onboard a vessel.
  2. Capability: Training and developing inspectors who are of the highest quality, consistency and integrity.
  3. Reliability: Strengthening vessel inspections and reducing the number of repeat inspections required.
  4. Adaptability: More rapid response to human factors, industry changes, regulatory framework updates and technology advances.

In future SIRE 2.0 will encompass all of OCIMF’s inspection programmes. This includes OCIMF’s Barge Inspection Report programme (BIRE) and Offshore Vessel Inspection Database (OVID). However, in an exclusive interview, Mr David Savage, who was responsible for the development and introduction of the SIRE Inspector Accreditation Programme back in 2000, said that the additional workload that comes with SIRE2 will impact both ship and shore staff, at least during the start-up months until familiarity and routines are established.

PSCOs to focus on STCW from 1 September to 30 November

This year, the planned Concentrated Inspections Campaigns across all MoUs will focus on STCW. In particular, for three months, PSC Officers will check topics relevant with STCW requirements to ensure full compliance.

In the past, a focused CIC took place in 2014 by Paris and Tokyo MoUs along with others, with the purpose to establish that watchkeeping personnel are meeting the requirements regarding hours of rest as per STCW 78 as amended (including the Manila amendments). For this year’s CIC, it remains for the questionnaire to be issued within summer in order to view the focus items of control.

Focused Inspection Campaign on planned maintenance in Australia

AMSA announced that a Focused Inspection Campaign (FIC) on Planned Maintenance will be conducted from 15 January 2022 to 30 March 2022. As such, AMSA surveyors will undertake the FIC in conjunction with a normal port or flag State control inspection and any port State control deficiencies will be reported to regional port State control databases.

The purpose of the FIC is to determine the level of compliance with the maintenance requirements of the International Conventions. AMSA PSCOs will be using a specific checklist when inspecting ships as part of the planned maintenance FIC and therefore, ship managers need to be prepared accordingly. Planned maintenance is an important aspect when considering seaworthiness.

Amendments to MARPOL Annex VI : Procedures for FO Sampling

Annex VI has been amended to introduce definitions distinguishing between “in-use” and “on board” fuel oil samples taken from a vessel. The entirety of Appendix VI of MARPOL Annex VI has also been revised to simplify the verification procedure for the “MARPOL delivered fuel oil sample” and to add verification procedures for the “in-use sample” and the “on board sample”, effective from 1st of April, 2022. This regulatory update applies to all ships ≥400gt and keel laid date ≥01/04/2022.

Amendments to regulations 14 and 18 of MARPOL Annex VI regarding sulphur content

Effective from 1st of April, 2022, new paragraphs 8 and 9 are added for ‘In-use and on board fuel oil sampling and testing’ and paragraphs 10 to 13 for ‘In-use fuel oil sampling point’ under regulation 14.

The verification procedure part 2 is to be followed in the new Verification procedures of Appendix VI of MARPOL Annex VI. For the test results, 95% confidence will be allowed (limit X + 0.59R) and the acceptable sulphur limits are extended to 0.11% and 0.53% for 0.10% and 0.5% respectively. Paragraph 8.2 has been replaced under regulation 18.

Amendments to the BWM Convention

To clarify the conduct of statutory surveys for Ballast Water Management Systems (BWMS), MEPC 75 adopted the amendments proposed to BWM regarding commissioning testing of ballast water management systems (Regulation E-1) and the form of the International Ballast Water Management Certificate (Appendix I), effective from 1st of June 2022.

Consequently, revised Guidance for the commissioning testing of ballast water management systems is available as BWM.2/Circ.70/Rev.1. The commissioning testing is to be conducted by an accredited entity which is independent from the BWMS manufacturer or supplier and one that is approved by the flag Administration or the RO working on its behalf.

Amendments to SOLAS VII regarding IMDG Code

In addition to the periodic review of carriage requirements for new and existing substances, these amendments introduce a new handling code for medical waste and other updated guidance, effective from June, 2022.

Amendments to MARPOL Annex VI regarding EEDI Regulations

Annex has been amended to mandate the reporting of required and attained EEDI values to the IMO. Tables providing EEDI reduction factors have been replaced. These amendments will come into force from November, 2022.

 

Source: skanregistry


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Philippos Philis has been appointed as new ECSA President by the General Assembly for a two-year term starting in January with Karin Orsel as new Vice-President. He succeeds Claes Berglund, who served as President since 2020.

“The beginning of the new ECSA Presidency comes at a very challenging time as the global economy is sailing through the uncharted waters of the COVID pandemic. In parallel, the shipping sector has to address environmental challenges such as the climate crisis and actively contribute to a new regulatory regime. We shall, at the same time, work towards achieving stable access to ship financing, EU’s free trade agenda, digitalization, maritime safety. It is essential that new regulations become an opportunity to enhance and not to undermine the competitiveness of our industry. This is why we need a strong voice of ECSA in Brussels” said the new ECSA President, Philippos Philis.

“The challenges that European shipping is facing are unprecedented. The pandemic has shown us the need to stand ready for unforeseen developments. And our shared objectives such as clean shipping, which is closely related to the immediate need to invest in innovation and the transition of shipping require a thorough analysis and a robust response from our industry. Shipping is an international industry and a global level playing field is necessary. At the same time, the industry is ready to be open and constructive and to participate in a dialogue with the EU policy makers” said the new ECSA Vice-President, Karin Orsel.

 

Source: ecsa


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C’est ce samedi 8 janvier sur le site du Havre de l’École Nationale Supérieure Maritime, qu’a débuté ce mois de janvier placé sous le signe de la rencontre avec les lycéennes et lycéens futurs élèves de l’ENSM.
L’occasion pour nos visiteurs passionnés de navigation d’assister à la présentation des formations, de visiter les simulateurs et d’obtenir des informations sur les recrutements.

Élèves et enseignants se sont réjouis d’accueillir d’effectuer des démonstration et de renseigner nos visiteurs au Havre.

Élèves et enseignants se sont réjouis d’accueillir d’effectuer des démonstration et de renseigner nos visiteurs au Havre.

 

Source: supmaritime


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The Dry Bulk Management Standard (DryBMS) helps assure ship managers of bulk carriers that they are meeting the right standards to achieve a good level of management.

It can be used to identify areas for change to make sure resources are used to support high-quality ship management. The tool consists of a draft self-assessment questionnaire  or review by the industry to gather feedback and opportunities for improvement. The vision is to launch a revised standard early in 2021, and a to incorporate a dashboard.

The questionnaire covers 30 subject areas of ship management, within four sections –
Performance, People, Plant and Process. The dashboard will show how a company’s self-assessment compares to other companies on a range of statistics that have been identified as indicators of good management.

 

Source: maritimecyprus


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February 7, 2022 GDPR

Ensea shipping agency & marine services based on Piraeus and provide services for bulk carriers and tankers and not limited to.

Our team considered from experienced and qualified personnel at maritime industry

Vision

To be a leader and provide our customers high quality and guarantee services
Our goal is to constantly act efficiently, responsible and reliable.

Mission

Offer our depth of knowledge and professional consultants to implement the requirements of each of our customers.

Provide services on time and effectively, and always with responsibility and reliability.

Assist our customers to take the best decisions for them without extra or hidden charges.

All the time our team to be updated with international regulations, conventions, etc.

The customer is our first priority, so our work is the presentation of our capabilities.

To be recognized as a highly and guaranteed marine services’ company of all aspects

 

Source: enseashipping


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February 7, 2022 GDPR

Smart Ports will follow smart cities, but as ports are fenced, critical, and commercially controlled, the adaption of new tech is faster.

Port control is comprehensive. The tasks are plenty. We provide drone solutions that will increase overview and efficiency at the port. Amongst others, we can monitor the port environment, do emission monitoring and provide time/cost critical deliveries. In parrticular, we have identified seven areas where drones can make a difference.

Within SECA / Port limits, we can deliver:

-Emissions monitoring (SOx, NOx)
-SAR (search and rescue)
-Monitoring of vessel work activities
-Spotting and localization of foreign objects
-Long range logistics

Within the breakwater, we deliver

-Traffic management
-Oil spill detection
-Medium range logistics

When it comes to the quayside, we can offer

-Mooring / unmooring services
-Loading / offloading services
-Maintenance support
-Inspections
-Use of ROV / USV for seabed mapping
-Radioactive monitoring

Drones for terminal use, consists of

-Dangerous goods inspections
-Internal port logistics
-Goods inspection
-Construction monitoring

Whilst securing the perimeter, drones can be used for

-Access control
-Perimeter security

Hinterland acitivies:

– Warehousing and inventory

For lastmile logistics we offe:

– Short range logistics

 

Source: nordicunmanned

 


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Completion of Tyra West facilities, which include two wellhead topsides, one riser topside and two bridges, mirrors earlier success achieved for the Tyra East facilities – further affirming Sembcorp Marine’s offshore fabrication expertise Achievement of production milestones, despite COVID-19 challenges, for both phases of TotalEnergies’ and Danish Underground Consortium’s Tyra Redevelopment Project demonstrates Sembcorp Marine’s operational resilience, flexibility and capabilities

Sembcorp Marine Ltd. (the “Company”, together with its subsidiaries, the “Group”) has successfully delivered two wellhead topsides, one riser topside and two bridges (“modules and bridges”) to TotalEnergies EP Denmark (“TotalEnergies”) and the Danish Underground Consortium (“DUC”) for the Tyra Field in the Danish North Sea. TotalEnergies operates the Tyra Field on behalf of the DUC – a partnership consisting of TotalEnergies (43.2 percent), Noreco (36.8 percent) and Nordsoefonden (20 percent).

The sailaway of the Tyra West modules and bridges from Sembcorp Marine Admiralty Yard today marks the second and final phase of the Group’s project undertaking for TotalEnergies and DUC’s Tyra Redevelopment Project. The Group completed the first phase of the project last year, with the sailaway of the Tyra East modules and bridges in July 2021. The two wellhead topsides, one riser
topside and two bridges are currently being hooked-up and commissioned onsite at the Tyra East Redevelopment Field.

Including the latest deliveries, the Group has completed a total of four wellhead topsides, two riser topsides and four bridges for the Tyra Redevelopment Project. The successful completion of the modules and bridges, amid unprecedented COVID19 challenges, affirms the Group’s operational resilience, flexibility and capabilities.

Sembcorp Marine was able to leverage its global supply chain and logistics networks to achieve its customer’s production milestones and meet exacting quality, safety, health and environmental requirements. Sembcorp Marine is pleased to have contributed to the redevelopment of Tyra’s energy infrastructure – envisioned to be a high-tech production and natural gas export hub over the next 25 years to support the operators’ pursuit of making their operations more sustainable.

Sembcorp Marine Head of Offshore Platforms, Mr Samuel Wong, said, “We are very pleased to complete the final phase of our project for TotalEnergies and DUC’s Tyra Redevelopment. We are heartened by the close collaboration with TotalEnergies. Since the award of the contract in 2019, we have worked as one team and in even tighter partnership to overcome and rise above the challenges brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic. Thank you for entrusting Sembcorp Marine with Tyra and the continued confidence in the Group. Today, we celebrate a significant milestone with the sailaway of the remaining modules and bridges.”

Head of Tyra Redevelopment for TotalEnergies said, “Today we celebrate the sailaway of the Tyra West facilities towards the North Sea. This is a key step forward for the Tyra Redevelopment Project and marks another successful conclusion to the long collaboration TotalEnergies has with Sembcorp Marine. The Sembcorp Marine and TotalEnergies teams deserve my appreciation as they’ve stayed relentless, committed and resilient to deliver six production topsides and four bridges according to agreed schedule despite constant challenges in a COVID-19 pandemic environment.”

 

Source: shipmanagementinternational